welding table from 1/8" plate?

I would like to have a little welding table for welding small
things. I have a plate (part of some military equipment) that is
approximately 1/8" thick, and 24x18" in dimensions.
I would like to know if this is too thin for a welding table and would
burn through during typical 130A TIG weld.
The nice thing about is is that it has bent edges and so it would
stand a little bit above a table where I would place it, it is not a
completely flat piece. The other nice thing about it is that I already
have it.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22416
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I made a welding table that has a 1/8 inch thick top. It is in two pieces, a base and the top so it is relatively portable and I can move it outside for welding. I have not had any problem with burning through it, but I probably stick some scrap under the work when I think I might weld the work to the table.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
1/8" is pretty thin. Unless you strike an arc on it, burn through should not be a problem though. I use my welding table to clamp stuff to, assuming that the adjacent sides are perpendicular and that the top is pretty close to flat. It is thick enough that stuff does not move around if it is clamped to the table top. I think that anything big enough to need 130A will distort 1/8" pretty easily.
You might be able to frame the top with angle iron or something to reduce the flex though.
Good Luck, Bob
Reply to
BobH
Thanks. My own idea is to use it as follows: to weld a "lip" underneath it, that would be used for 1) attaching a return clamp and 2) for holding this table in my vise. I have a portable "dirty" grinding table on wheels with grinder, chop saw, and a vise, and will use this whole setup to secure the welding "table" in the vise's jaws when needed.
This way, when I do not need this "welding table", I would simply free it from the vise and stick somewhere in the corner.
Picture in ASCII is here
,----------------. 1/8" plate /]|[\ Lip in vise ==========| vise xxxxxxxxxxxxxx - XXXXXXXXXXXXXX portable table
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22416
Make it out of 6mm plate, then it would be quite usable. 1/8 just isnt thick enough to clamp anything too, without risking major distortion.
k
Reply to
Ken
You will have to grind off stuck dingleberries, stray beads, etc, from time to time. A 1/8" plate will slowly get thinner. But, you already have it, so why not go ahead and use it as long as it still works for you?
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
90% of my welding table is crap that was left over when the former house owner left (he was a welder). Just the legs are stuff that I bought.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
Yes. "Oil Can Effect"
Put a plate of at minimum...3/8" plate on top. This gives you something sorta solid enought to clamp to.
Ive a big 5x8' welding table but recently scrounged up a simple 24x36" square tubing legged table with a 1/2" top. I find this to be where I do most of my TIG work now days. Tall enough to sit a chair under, but still low enough to easily work on, solid enough to clamp anywhere, and small enough that I CAN clamp nearly anywhere ..sometimes too big a table makes clamping hard on small stuff. So the big table gets all the MIG/Stick work..which tends to be much much bigger and the lil one gets all the TIG detail work.
Cost nothing except dragging it out of a scrap pile and .99c for a quick shot of Rustoleum Bottle Green from a rattle can purchased at the local 99c store. (legs only...)
It does look a bit odd..that big assed (800lb) Airco Squarewave 300 servicing that lil 2x3' table...but it serves my needs just dandy.
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
Reply to
Gunner
FWIW... I have a dinky shop and made a welding table that folds up against the wall when not in use. I used a 18" x 24" piece of .125" steel for the top and it works fine. I am TIG welding small pieces. I welded some angle iron on the sides and it's tolerably stiff. I do clamp things I'm welding onto it - mostly for positioning - but it does serve to keep small things from warping.
While not ideal, it is quite workable for what I do.
Peter
Reply to
Peter Grey
Yep. Forgot to ask, that thing is yellow, cadmium plated. Any problem with that?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus25463
OK, very nice to know. I think that I have nothing to lose and it will work for small stuff (which is mostly what I weld).
i
Reply to
Ignoramus25463
Gunner, you are a great, examplary scrounger. I am far behind, though I think that I am OK at that also. That said, I do not have space for a standalone permanent welding table, period. So I have to live with something I can easily stow away.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus25463
1/8" plate won't be a problem burning though it unless you flat out miss your work piece and lay a good bead on the table. (Don't laugh, I've seen it done more than once!) On the downside, 1/8" plate is not thick enough to clamp things down, that's where a nice chunk of 1/4" to 1/2" plate with suitable holes is just wonderful (we have a welding table made from a piece of 3/4" die plate with various flame cut holes as well as lots of threaded 1/2" holes.) The 1/8" plate will heat warp (or even 'pop' up) if you get a lot of heat on it, especially if doing A/C welding.
18"x24" would be a bit small for many of my projects, if you are doing small stuff, it should be fine. You idea of clamping it in the vice is fine although you may do one of those "weld, grind, file, weld, repeat adnausaum" projects where you would want both the weld table and the vice at the same time. (One of my main complaints with the Shopsmith woodworking equipment)
Ignoramus22416 wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Cad fumes are NOT GOOD. And you will heat it up enough to oxidize the surface one section at a time. Seems to me you are trying to do this in an enclosed space. Not good a second time. I'd really rather use a different piece of steel. :(
Ignoramus25463 wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
I have made three welding tables, all 4' x 10'. But then, I make a lot of wrought iron (ornamental metal) and those are handy.
But for almost everything else, I find a solid table restrictive. i.e. You cannot clamp things down as easily.
I don't see the logic in a solid table. Help me out. Am I missing something?
I have found that by making my tables with the proper spacing of components, it makes things very easy to clamp, and you can get at a lot of places you couldn't with a solid table.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
If your t\ble is 1/8" or more thick. you can drill and tap holes in it for clamps if you need to.., Just a thought
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
I bought a 3/16" piece of steel, approximately 1.5x3 feet in size, with one corner cut off diagonally. I wil make a welding table out of that.
I may well drill some holes in it for fixturing, though I have not decided on that yet.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus17993
You can always burn a triangle hole or slot or ... with a plasma torch!
I know yo have one Iggie
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member
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Ignoramus17993 wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn

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