Final nail in the coffin of "lift tanks by cap" idea

I brought home a tank (came with a huge MIG welder) where I thought the cap was sitting snugly. Tank was made in 1942. Moved it around,
etc etc. Took off the cap to check pressure. Then after checking remaining pressure in that tank, I tried to put it back on. TO my surprise, the cap simply lid right back on over the threads. The cap did not need to be screwed except perhaps for the last turn.
If I lifted this tank by the cap, without any doubt, it would be a disaster, maybe of small proportions.
--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
|I brought home a tank (came with a huge MIG welder) where I thought | the cap was sitting snugly. Tank was made in 1942. Moved it around, | etc etc. Took off the cap to check pressure. Then after checking | remaining pressure in that tank, I tried to put it back on. TO my | surprise, the cap simply lid right back on over the threads. The cap | did not need to be screwed except perhaps for the last turn. | | If I lifted this tank by the cap, without any doubt, it would be a | disaster, maybe of small proportions. | |
No one should use or handle cylinders in any fashion, if they are not competent to assess the condition of the cap and threads.
If you are the kind of person that would hoist a cylinder by the cap (or move or transport it for that matter) without verifying the fit of the cap, then you have no business handling them at all.
Based on your description of your new cylinders condition, you should release all but a few pounds of pressure, and find a reliable vendor to inspect and repair it. It sounds like it might just be the wrong cap. All caps are not the same.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I "assessed" condition of the cylinder and determined that the cap was snug.
Nothing could be further from the truth, in fact, something that I learned by unscrewing the cap later and then realizing that it falls through threads.

I think that I would rather pass on the idea of lifting cylinders by cap, and will use other methods in the future.

I have not had time to look yet. This cylinder was an unexpected freebie that came with a 800 lbs MIG/Stick welder called Mega-Flex 650 RVS, that I picked up at Rock Island Arsenal. You are probably right, I have a small assortment of caps and I will try them.
--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| >|I brought home a tank (came with a huge MIG welder) where I thought | >| the cap was sitting snugly. Tank was made in 1942. Moved it around, | >| etc etc. Took off the cap to check pressure. Then after checking | >| remaining pressure in that tank, I tried to put it back on. TO my | >| surprise, the cap simply lid right back on over the threads. The cap | >| did not need to be screwed except perhaps for the last turn. | >| | >| If I lifted this tank by the cap, without any doubt, it would be a | >| disaster, maybe of small proportions. | >| | >| | > | > No one should use or handle cylinders in any fashion, if they are not | > competent to assess the condition of the cap and threads. | | I "assessed" condition of the cylinder and determined that the cap was | snug.
Unless you are the one that snugged the cap, which you shouldn't, a snug cap is a good reason to inspect the threads. Caps should never be snug. The should be completely seated, but turn easily, otherwise look for a problem just like the one you found.
| | Nothing could be further from the truth, in fact, something that I | learned by unscrewing the cap later and then realizing that it falls | through threads.
The very reason to inspect the threads on a snug cap.
| | > If you are the kind of person that would hoist a cylinder by the cap (or | > move or transport it for that matter) without verifying the fit of the cap, | > then you have no business handling them at all. | | I think that I would rather pass on the idea of lifting cylinders by | cap, and will use other methods in the future.
Obviously a lot of people would, and a lot of organizations will always forbid the practice. However, this prohibition does nothing to prove the practice unsafe. My "guess" would be, that people forbid it because far too many people would do so without taking a second to check the condition of the cap and threads.
| | > Based on your description of your new cylinders condition, you should | > release all but a few pounds of pressure, and find a reliable vendor to | > inspect and repair it. It sounds like it might just be the wrong cap. All | > caps are not the same. | | I have not had time to look yet. This cylinder was an unexpected | freebie that came with a 800 lbs MIG/Stick welder called Mega-Flex 650 | RVS, that I picked up at Rock Island Arsenal. You are probably right, | I have a small assortment of caps and I will try them.
Good luck with your project.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ignoramus5437 wrote:

Jeeze Iggy,
What is it with these big welders??? You gotta big lump in the Miller and a big 3phase lump in the Hobart....
BTW that MF650RVS wants 100A 460V for the rated load, turn the switch to Sub Arc and short the posts and it'll eat a lot more. (Then WIFEY might be eatin' something)!!!!
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I love messing with welders and selling them (as well as welding as such). I already tested both this Aircrafter and the Hobart 650RVS, which required rewiring both for 230v (single and three phase respectively).
What surprised me was just how dust free they were inside. A lot less dust than outside. They impression they give off is that they were not used much.

maybe we'll see some fireworks too.
--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That clinches it. You're the only one on THIS planet who is THAT qualified.
We bow to you, oh Great One.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: | >> | | >> No one should use or handle cylinders in any fashion, if they are not | >> competent to assess the condition of the cap and threads. | | That clinches it. You're the only one on THIS planet who is THAT qualified. | | We bow to you, oh Great One. |
I would hope at least 99% of the people in the world are capable of checking threads for SEVERE damage. Sorry you're apparently not one of them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Getting fitted for new front teeth are not small proportions, in my opinion.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| >I brought home a tank (came with a huge MIG welder) where I thought | > the cap was sitting snugly. Tank was made in 1942. Moved it around, | > etc etc. Took off the cap to check pressure. Then after checking | > remaining pressure in that tank, I tried to put it back on. TO my | > surprise, the cap simply lid right back on over the threads. The cap | > did not need to be screwed except perhaps for the last turn. | > | > If I lifted this tank by the cap, without any doubt, it would be a | > disaster, maybe of small proportions. | > | > -- | | Getting fitted for new front teeth are not small proportions, in my opinion. | | Steve |
Stop holding your teeth over or in front of, things your a moving.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.