Forging Info Needed

All I want to do is soften some 3/16" -3/8" square, round and flat stock and make several hundred hooks. And hammer some leaves out of thin plate after I had cut them out with a plasma cutter. Purely decorative stuff involving small pieces of stock. I really don't want to melt anything. Just soften it a bit for shaping, twisting, and flattening. Simple, simple stuff.
I got lots of links and designs and tips. Enough to keep me busy far longer than the time I have to spare. I am sure that I will be able to build a forge econimically that will do all I ask of it.
That is, if I EVER get done with all this wrought iron. Just built and painted another 16' of fence today with backing, and another four foot gate. Only 20' of fence, another two double gates, and three security doors to go! This is fun, but I am getting very tired of it all. But, after it being too hot this summer to do it, I must sieze the moment while the weather is cool. It was about 65 today, and a great day for welding.
It will be a treat to do some forging and hammering after all this sawing, welding and painting. Oh, I forgot ...... installing, too.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
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I have plans for both a coal forge and a propane forge on my web site. They are free. the propane forge is the venturi type but a blower can be added by just connecting a blower at the reducing bushing. I have it both ways in my shop. This burner was designed by Rupert Wenig and I have used it over five years (almost daily) and it is still performing perfectly.
The refractory can be very easy and cheap by using Kaowool or Inswool which is a ceramic blanket. Just cut with scissors and insert into the forge. It does not work well if you plan to weld due to the flux eating it but for your application it is very easy and cheap.
The design on my site is used daily to forge and sometimes to weld (usually use my johnson for welding).
If you have access to coal you can make the brake drum forge and use coal or charcoal for fuel. Still need a blower but many use a hair drier.
Ron Reil's site is a must see if you plan to build a forge. Even if you don't like the designs he has, the information is invaluable. As far as I know, there is not another site on the web with as much info as Ron's.
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Be sure to read ALL of the safety info.
Bob
Reply to
Bob
I made a couple of burners, venturi type, they work good but for better control use a acetylene/propane type regulator. You can run from 1 or two lbs to about 30 psi thru a .055 jet. I been thinking about building a forge with some lava rock and some firebrick and a venturi burner.
Reply to
Jon
GMTA? I've been toying with a similar idea for demos, a gas burner blowing sidewise or upward into a pile of firebrick and lava rocks and built to resemble an early American or even Medieval forge.
Pure fakery and cosmetics, but more convenient than coal or charcoal, and might help to disturb the "atmosphere" less.
Reply to
John Husvar
Steve, I'm eventually going to be building some fence, too. What paint do you use and how does it hold up to the exposure--you're in Vegas, right?
Any good tips or time-savers on the construction?
Jeff Dantzler
Reply to
Jeff Dantzler
When I was in the business, I used to use enamel. Cheap stuff, and it lasted a very long time. I used to thin it with lacquer thinner, gasoline,, anything. I used most any solvent to clean it up. Then the California laws changed, and it affected the types of paint you could get.
This time, I went to Home Depot, and told them what I wanted to use the paint for. They gave me some kind of stuff. Glidden Ultrahide alkalyd/oil. It cleans up with paint thinner. It is a lot thicker. It is not nearly as "hot" as the other, that is, having aromatic elements that I would consider flammable. It is much "softer" and takes forever to dry. I have changed my painting techniques to allow for more drying time. The old stuff would dry fast, and even faster if I put some Japanese dryer in it.
I have had some major health concerns in the past few years, so I don't mind the non enamel stuff. I don't want to breathe a lot of aromatics. I do use Rustoleum enamel on things that I want to really have a hard paint coat, and things that I want to look good for a long time. But this stuff is just outdoor stuff, and I just want it to look good. Plus, the SO wanted a particular color, and that is not easy to get economically in enamel when you are using ten gallons.
I can't really speak of how it holds up under exposure. The old stuff held up great. Some of it is still looking good and hanging all over Las Vegas ...... awnings and ornamental metal. And I started in 1980.
I wouldn't use the stuff I am using for my personal stuff now if this was for a money job. I would get some enamel. If you want a very standard color, I suggest you use something like RustOLeum (sp?) enamel. There is also some paint called implement enamel that dries very hard.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
I am not arguing the feasability, just the amount of time required to hit that temperature.
I once had a nice coke fire going and left a large cast iron ladle in the heat, turned my head for a minute and the ladle was melted - gone. This was with no refractory.
Also, the volume of the furnace chamber makes a huge difference. The larger the chamber or the larger your charge, the more difficult, etc etc.
Reply to
Critter
Also, look at the drawing of his furnace. He has a 150CFM blower feeding from the bottom. You could probably get the same result from venturi alone, but would be much harder.
An oil burner with a blower will get you there FAST, but I really dont think that ceramic fiber wool can take the heat.
A good steel or bronze furnace should have an insulating system. Use alumina/silica or zirconia for the inner chamber, it should be the castable stuff, not fiber. Surround this with ceramic fiber (alumina wool). Then, I personally would surround that with an outer layer of cheap fiberglass from Home Depot.
If you hook up an oil burner to a chamber like that, you'll have molten steel very quickly. The question then becomes - what do you do with molten steel ??
You could make some nice tools out of old engine parts. Almost all moving parts inside an engine are chrome vanadium steel.
Reply to
Critter
I actually did a couple experiments with motor oil just to test things out. I dont think that people give it enough credit. In fact, I'd say that the stuff deserves some healthy respect and I aint jokin'.
That stuff really goes WOOOOFFFF.
Must say I was rather impressed.
Reply to
Critter

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