Hilti angle grinders?

Has anyone here used a Hilti angle grinder? I know all about the hammer drills, but you don't heard about their other products. Just bought a DC-400-L off eBay
for $30. Case, wheels, parts, and everything. Looks decent from the photos.
I'm curious to know what you guys think. The grinders are targeted more at stone finishing so they're geared for higher speeds. 11K for the 4.5" version. I'm guessing they'd be well-sealed because of the stone and masonry use.
GTO(John)
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Yes.
Ooops.
I'll go easy since you've already made your purchase.
They are not all bad. Mine works ok for light work, but I think my Milwaukee is about three times the quality.
Just run the small diameter wheels and it should do fine (no cup brushes).
Just my 2 cents worth.
(`._. rr ._.)

drills,
eBay
photos.
version.
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Anything in particular you're not happy with, or just lousy quality in general? I guess there's a reason you only hear about their hammer drills.
This is just for either running a light grinding or cutoff wheel--I blew the gearbox in my second grinder and chaning wheels or cup brushes is a PITA. Most of my time has been spent with B&D/DeWalt DW402-type grinders, and I figured I'd trying thinking out of the box.
At least this thing has some good resale value if I don't like it.
GTO(John)

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general? It's likely more of personal preference than anything else. It just did not seem to turn my heavy cup brush as well as my other grinder. I keep small wheels on it so it can turn-up where it seems to work well (high RPM).
--
(`._. rr ._.)


"GTO69RA4" < snipped-for-privacy@aol.com> wrote in message
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (GTO69RA4) wrote in message

I know a weldor in California who has several of them. He does maintenance welding for an aircraft plant and uses his daily. He reported no problems.
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I started a recent thread on this subject because a local guy had a bunch of Hilti & Bosch factory demos he was trying to unload.
Like many folks around here, I'm looking for a few extra angle grinders so I don't always have to change wheels.
I went and looked at the Hilti and decided it wasn't appropriate for me because it spun at 11,000 rpm. I wanted a high-power, high-torque (= lower rpm) grinder. Another observation that I made was that the guard on the Hilti was made from much thinner steel than the guard on my FLEX-made Porter Cable. It was clear that the Hilti was more of a mason's tool than a metalworkers tool. It came with a thin "grinding" wheel (I would have called it a cutoff wheel) and a steel/diamond grit stone-cutting wheel. Frankly, I'd be scared of a cup brush going 11,000 rpm attached to a 15A moter.
HTH
Jeff Dantzler Seattle, WA
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I did a quick check in the Metabo and Dewalt catalogues and it seems that all small grinders run at 10000-11000 rpm, unless they are special polishing grinders of course. Bigger grinders run slower, which is normal because they use bigger discs and the linear speed at the cutting edge of the disc is therefore about the same.
OTOH, in any big brand you will find at least one small grinder with adjustable electronic speed control. Curiously, this feature does not appear to be very popular, but I have one grinder with it (from Metabo) and I find this feature very useful when running wire brushes. I can adjust the speed between 2500 and 10000 rpm and find myself running cup brushes around the middle of this range.
Obviously you don't get higher torque from the variable speed control as you would from a different set of gears, but I do not feel that cup brushes need a lot of torque.
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On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 14:57:44 -0000, Jeff Dantzler

What speed do angle grinders normally run at in the USA ?
Here in Europe, the normal speed for a 4 1/2" grinder is 10 or 11K. The 4" grinders (with the smaller M10 thread) run at 12K. These are for either 240V or 110V (on-site) kit.
9" grinders are 6K6. -- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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A lot of them run at 10k or 11k--mind you these are the common 4 1/2" grinders.
My 6" Porter Cable (made by Flex) runs at 9,500 rpm.
If I remember, the Flex brand grinders run at 6,000 rpm.
I like the slower grinder speeds. It's always a tossup between the power of a grinder and it's weight. The PC (9A) is a great grinder-- as are the Flex ones I used in Ernie's class.
When I mentioned scary, it was in reference to the 15A 7" or 9" Hilti I looked at buying. Their website said 8,000 rpm, but the name plate said 11,000. Running a big cup brush that fast is asking for trouble...
Jeff
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