LAthe Advice?

If it's Ontario Canada, pick up a TriAd buy and sell paper - lots of ads for machines and dealers.
Brian


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SORRY, Ontario CANADA
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HotRod wrote:

basic
my own

degree
just a

can still

people
looking at?

1: A lathe is more accurate and more practical than a mill for round things (this because some people have suggested a mill and you seem confused).
2: Have a look at http://www.mini-lathe.com for enlightement. You don't have to buy that specific lathe (although it will fit the job), but you will learn what you can do on a small lathe.
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jerry snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:>

A lathe is more accurate... (this depends on the operator/machinist) and more practical than a mill for round things.... (yes, this is true) This because some people have suggested a mill and you seem confused.... (He asked, can you make round things with a mill? Yes you can)

The mini-lathe would be a great machine to learn how with. He has stated he wanted machines he could grow with. The mini-lathe has it's limits on size of parts that can be made.
In a post earier from Peter, he mentions that he also makes auto parts and uses his mill alot more then a lathe. But since the OP has a huge shop he should get both.
Bridgeport mill or clone and a 16x? lathe
That's my take, Jack
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Cheap crap lathes are _much_ more accurate than cheap mills.
It's intrinisc in the design of a lathe that it can turn something that's more accurate than the lathe itself. OTOH, a mill can't make anything more accurate than itself, and usually rather worse owing to vibration. So a "bottom end" lathe might be a useful tool, whilst a similar quality mill is just an exercise in frustration.
It's rarely done these days, but in the glory days of steam engine building on Myford 7s, a lot of milling was done on the cross slide. Myford even fitted it with T slots specially. You can also achieve a lot of flat surface machining by turning a non-round piece bolted to the faceplate.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

There is still a vertical crossslide adapter that fits in said T slots. Works a treat, on jobs roughly 3" x 3".
Steve
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On the other hand, I have a South Bend milling attachment that I adapted to my Logan 9" lathe, and I have given up on using it. I had two problems with the setup. First, the adapter mounts to a circular dovetail on the cross-slide, and while my adapter seems to be stable, the setscrews that clamp onto the dovetail like to slip at inopportune times drawing the work into the cutter and causing a crash. The second is that my saddle is designed to take load down, bearing on the ways, but has maybe .010" play if something wants to lift the saddle. Again this play has caused a crash or two if its own.
Funny how pieces seem to move gently away from a milling cutter but, if they are going to move into the cutter, they always seem to jump. Must be a positive feedback loop.
Some lathe designs seem to tolerate milling much better than mine. I gave up on mine and now have a Clausing mill to go with the lathe. Not too many crashes on the Clausing with the 3" Kurt vise.
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wrote:

a 12-14" lathe will do 99.999% of the sort of work this fellow will likely ever do.
Anything over that..and tis simply too big, too heavy and doesnt turn fast enough for his sort of work.
Gunner, Machine tool repair tech, broker for machine tools
Liberals - Cosmopolitan critics, men who are the friends of every country save their own. Benjamin Disraeli
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I would suggest a 9 x 20 Lathe about a grand and a very good size to learn on. Well tooled out with DRO doable for about $2,000. Excellent for one off and learning lathe operation with still enough size for many projects. Check Enco and Grizzley for pricing. This lathe can also be converted too CNC at a later date fairly cheaply.
Join yahoo Group 9 x 20 Lathe group resources and information are excellent. As usual for Chinese it is an assembled kit some work and you can have an excellent machine!
Ken
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Hum. Not sure I would agree with that. I know two guys that started with 9x20s. One guy upgraded to a rockwell 11x24 and is so much happier. Its a lot more lathe for about the same cost. The other guy upgraded to a myford super 7. Pretty much the same size, but has a real QC gear box and a nice QC toolpost too for 2k.
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On 12 May 2005 14:14:09 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@w-sherwood.ih.lucent.com (Chuck Sherwood) wrote:

I've never understood Myfords. Sure, they're nice enough, but they're _tiny_ (esp. through the headstock) and the prices are insane. Fetish objects for the model engineering duffers.
Give me a Colchester or a Triumph any day.
--
Cats have nine lives, which is why they rarely post to Usenet.

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Have you ever used one? I have owed three. I presently have a nice minty green one that feels like new. It is very pleasant to use and can do serious work for a small lathe.
I have a VERY nice rockwell 11x24 that has 5C collets and just about every accessory you could want, but I still use the Myford S7 for lots of things, particulary small things when I need high RPM.
I think a Colchester would be too big and slow for many things I do. However I could probably be pursuaded to trade my myford in on a Hardinge HLV!
chuck
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On 13 May 2005 14:00:21 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@w-sherwood.ih.lucent.com (Chuck Sherwood) wrote:

I have both <G>
http://home.lightspeed.net/~gunner/myshop
Gunner
"Veterans, and anyone sensible, take cover when there's incoming. A cloud of testosterone makes a piss poor flack shield." <Offbreed>
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buy who painted it with a spray can? I'm refering to that big red 20!
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On 13 May 2005 18:31:19 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@w-sherwood.ih.lucent.com (Chuck Sherwood) wrote:

The owner, prior to the auction (which never happened). His version of a lot number. Cleaned off pretty well with some anti-grafiti spray paint remover.
Gunner
"War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself." - John Stewart Mill
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(Chuck

Great pictures, thanks....
xman
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Gunner wrote:

Yeah, it was about that long ago, I guess, that we talked about it. (I was under the name "Pete Somebody" back then.) Anyway I got my shaper about that time: saw it on ebay, got Pete Albrecht to look at the auction listing & give me his opinion. I bought it and haven't been sorry. I know shapers are obsolete and all, but they're such a kick to use. The machine itself is as interesting as the engines I make with it. (See the shaper section of my website.)
It was especially useful because my mill was such crap. Now I have no mill at all, and that's worse....
Pete
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Artful Bodger
http://www.artfulbodger.net
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If a shaper is obsolete, what made it obsolete? What works better these days that didn't before?
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snipped-for-privacy@sneakemail.com wrote:

Mills.
From a commercial standpoint, shapers can't win because they use a single point bit. A mill, using a multipoint cutter, can remove metal a LOT faster, while at the same time being a more versatile machine. A mill can do weird shapes, pockets and whatnot, that a shaper can't. There are some things a shaper can do that a mill can't, like internal splines & keyways, but in industry that hasn't been enough to save them from the scrap heap.
In terms of accuracy, apparently the mill is superior. It doesn't look like it, but that's what I've been told by reliable people. The shaper can leave a much prettier finish, while still not making the surface as flat as a mill can.
BUT: for a guy in his garage, the shaper has some real selling points. Maybe an ace modern mill (what do they cost?) can make a flatter surface, but it's being compared to an old, beat shaper (since there are no new ones). What I discovered is that a shaper THAT I CAN AFFORD makes a flatter surface than a mill THAT I CAN AFFORD.
Also, there's tooling. Milling cutters are not cheap to get or to have sharpened. The shaper uses, basically, a lathe bit. You buy it for not much, grind it yourself, and when it gets dull, grind that sucker again. It's a very cheap machine to run. (There are a couple of sections on shaper tool bits on my website.)
If you don't have either, get a good mill first; but thereafter, if you find one, a shaper can be a great addition to your shop. Little ones cost more than big ones. Supply and demand: HSMs want the little ones, but nobody at all wants the big 'uns, and everything's priced accordingly.
_Almost_ nobody wants the big ones. I do, though. All in good time.
Pete
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Artful Bodger
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On Sun, 15 May 2005 12:46:14 GMT, artfulbodger

Excellent post.
One also might mention in cutting dovetails for example..a new dovetail cutter may well cost as much as an entire shaper.
Gunner
"War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself." - John Stewart Mill
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