plasma cutting safety gear ?

Hi,
what safety gear people use, or should I say "should use " when working with a plasma cutters?
millers online manual say to use #5 or #6 shade safety lens with face
plate to protect from UV burn , and protect skins as well. pretty much same thing as for welding except for the 5-6 shade glass.
I've been looking for #5 in the local store , with no luck
what gives?
thanks
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#5 goggles are common for gas cutting and welding. They work fine for most midrange plasma cutting.
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thanks Ernie,
please clearify.... just goggles for gas welding and cutting , because only brighter light is present . (eyes)
with plasma , there is an electric arc and UV , while #5 goggle maybe enoug for the eyes, doesn't the face or skins need to be covered ?
I do have a gas welding goggle , but i would hate to get an early sunburn in february.
thanks , please advise.
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You certainly can get #5 lenses for a regular arc welding helmet. AAA welding supply (I'm not even a customer, though I probably will be since my local supplier won't give me any sort of a break on an EQC) lists them (only in the smaller standard size) for 96 cents apeice, standard Jackson items, any shade from 4 through 12. Look them up on the web.
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#5 goggles are fine for plasma cutters up to 50 amp (1/2"). There is some UV from the arc, but it is minimal.
A #5 lens for a full face shield will give better face protection, but they are difficult to keep clean.
For heavier cutting, such as 75 amp or 100 amp plasma cutters, where you are actually staring at the arc, get a 4" x 5" lens welding hood and put a #7 or #8 gold lens in it. If you have trouble seeing your line before you start the arc, then point a small cheap quartz work light at the workpiece.
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thanks Ernie,
the cutting will be under 35 amp ,
On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 01:02:53 GMT, Ernie Leimkuhler

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Shade 5 is typical for the goggles used in Oxy/Acet torch cutting and welding. I have a pair of safety glasses that look more like sun glasses that are #5's. I picked them up from my local welding shop for $5 or so and they work great for O/A and plasma cutting.
I'm sure a full face shield would be better but you still don't need a full welding helmet because you can buy #5 filters for standard face shields like these:
http://www.mscdirect.com/PDF.process?pdf'38&Keyword=Y
Best Regards, Keith Marshall snipped-for-privacy@progressivelogic.com
"I'm not grown up enough to be so old!"

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As far as the sunburn goes, I would think you should be ok, since it is more like the arc/debris is being blown out the other side of your work, where arc welding puts the arc right in front of you. Plasma usually puts the arc "through" the work, where it isn't burning you like most welding.
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thank you guys,
I will use what I got , an a/o welding goggle and a full face shiled for debris protectin.
On 16 Feb 2004 07:15:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net (PHIL) wrote:

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On 16 Feb 2004 07:15:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net (PHIL) wrote:

I think you're pretty much right.
I used to use my auto-shade facemask with the lens turned right down -- but it was cumbersome and annoying so I now use nothing except my presecription glases which are virtually opaque to UV anyway. Oh, I also wear long-sleeved shirt and TIG gloves.
Despite some plasma-cutting sessions that have lasted 30 minutes or so, I've *never* had any signs of UV burn on my face.
Like yourself, I find that most of the arc is on the other side of the work so the only UV you get is that reflected from the floor.
One caveat however is that I'm usually only cutting fairly thin stainless (1mm (0.040") so don't have the current wound up all that high.
-- you can contact me via http://aardvark.co.nz/contact /
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