stick welding aluminium

Hi all
i am trying to stick weld a aluminium cylinder head.
problem is i cant get any penetration at all, the aluminium from the stick
melts, but hardly any heat goes into the casting, so the aluminium is
dropped on the workpiece.
I am using 3,5 mm AWS A5.3 E 4047 (din EL AlSi5 ) electrodes and a DC
welder (actually my tig welder) , reversing the polarity made no
difference.
anybody tried stick welding aluminium?
I am a bit at loss what to change, may be drop the power , to slow the
melting of the stick? or pre heating the part?
may be using even thicker electrodes?? the welder is a old fashioned huge
transformer type, so more power isnt a problem.
i managed pretty decent welds on pieces of aluminium scrap 3 mm thick, just
cant seem to get any burn in with bigger parts.
cheers
hubert
Reply to
hubert
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thick, just
You are setting yourself a difficult task there ! All the heat is being sucked into the relatively cool aluminium head which has a far higher thermal capacity than your 3mm test piece. You >>may
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
You do have to preheat thicker aluminum before you can stick weld it. I've seen it work on 1/4" aluminum. I think it was preheated in the 200 to 400 deg F range. I don't know anything about doing it for an aluminium cylinder head however.
Reply to
Curt Welch
Stick welding aluminum heads is a no go. Tig them if at all possible, mig as a last resort, with a thorough pre heat not not just a guick pass with a torch. I own a cylinder head shop and weld them often. Lamar
Reply to
wbutler
Andrew,
Doesn't aluminum also require AC? (Ignore the fact that he's trying to weld a cylinder head)
I don't do much aluminum, so I want to tuck this info into my "good to know" category.
"Andrew Maws>
Reply to
jp2express
aware
'solution
Conventionally yes
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
I tried stick welding aluminum, the result was a good looking weld that was COMPLETELY unsatisfactory. It was porous, like a bagel, and very weak.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus2168
"Ignoramus2168" schreef in bericht news:X_qdnTMj-J_NgBTbnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com...
the welding on the small pieces was amazingly good, but as i mentioned , welding on a bigger part was less succesfull. i had a look at the box from the welding sticks, they should be used with DC, positive side to the stick. unfortunately no mention of pre heating , or recommended power. next i will try pre heating the part, and see what happens..
i know this job should be done with a TIG, ,but my (dc) tig welder doesnt weld aluminium... and i have to add a lot of metal to change the shape of a combustion chamber, filling a combustion chamber with weld would probably take ages with a TIG welder...
thanks for all the answers.. i'll keep you posted..
cheers, Hubert
Reply to
hubert
MIG would come handy in this case. But still preheating, no way without it.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
You can tig it with DC. Gotta be anal about cleanliness, run it DC straight and stop when you have to and brush the oxide off with a stainless brush.
One of my old books says, concerning welding/brazing up combustion chambers, to figure the volume you wish to add in length of filler rod and scratch this length on the rod- put the same length of rod in each chamber and you've raised the compression in each cylinder equally.
John
Reply to
JohnM
That may be true for modern engines but volkswagen heads were aluminum and frequently cracked between the valve seats and thousands have been repaired by welding. But you are certainly correct in saying they are a highly efficient heat sink.
Bruce in Bangkok (brucepaigeatgmaildotcom)
Reply to
Bruce
Stick welding aluminum is DCEP, if I remember correctly.
Bruce in Bangkok (brucepaigeatgmaildotcom)
Reply to
Bruce
That is you =:-( Thousand of Frohof (spelling) trailers were stick welded before the days of MIG.
Bruce in Bangkok (brucepaigeatgmaildotcom)
Reply to
Bruce
That would be Fruehauf.
Bob
Reply to
Bob F
Hi all,
I don't know much about welding ! and I came accross this name HTS2000 stick for braze. I just wonder these guys that use HTS2000 have to say about welding a cylinder head. You could check out the HTS2000 on the web.
Ciao and have fun
Reply to
Linh Hien Nguyen
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Reply to
Curt Welch

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