Welding other than mild steel?

I have a Lincoln WeldPack 100 using the recommended 0.035" innershield wire.
The manual states it can only weld mild steel but what does it take to weld
harder steel with this thing?
Reply to
** Frank **
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Harder steels are either higher carbon or higher alloy. Either one can give you troubles with poor penetration or brittle welds. Your welder can be made to work on these steels but Lincoln does not want to be responsible for training you on how to do them properly.
If you post a specific steel, thickness, and application that you are trying to work on, someone here can give you hints on how to make it work.
** Frank ** wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Thanks RoyJ. I know it can weld harder steel as I fused my lockjaw pliers together by mistake. I'll play around with the Lincoln some more and post back when I have something more specific. Thanks again.
Reply to
** Frank **
The really scary one is welding common rebar. Most of the bar you would see at a home store or otherwise laying around is either .4% or .6% carbon. If you weld that and cool it rapidly, it gets very hard and brittle. I do a demo where I weld it with a stick welder then plunge it into cold water to chill it quickly. It will shatter like glass when dropped on the floor from chest height.
** Frank ** wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Cool, I'll try that when I have some time.
Reply to
** Frank **
Most Rebar manufacturers now manufacture a lower carbon steel rebar, it gains its strength from a quenching process during manufacture which gives it a harder exterior with a tempered core. Usually if its carbon content is below .39% it doesn't require preheat (depending upon combined joint thickness), but still needs slow cooling. If you have access to a press of some type, either hydraulic or armstrong, do yourself a favour and do up a sample weld. Try a "T" fillet joint using 6mm low carbon steel plate, crank the machine all the way up and run a fillet weld on one side only. Let it cool then bust the bugger open using the press. This is a great way of seeing how much fusion you are getting into both the plates, or lack of. I know guys who have welded up trailers etc. and then had the opportunity to break open some of their mig welds, the term "turning white" describes their expression well. Gasless innershield tends to be one of the worst culprits for shit welds with small machines no matter how skilled the operater IMHO.
Reply to
Rod Day
Not quite the same but it reminds me of prince Ruperts drops, a glassblowing thing, if you have some nearby ask them to demonstrate
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's_DropsNumbs the hand for a short while when you let one off in you hand but you end up with a handfull of glass firt.
Reply to
David Billington
enzymes in urine as a total entity. Urokinase causes vasodilation and resembles nitroglycerine in its ability to strengthen the bloodstream from the coronary artery to the cardiac muscle. Urokinase is extracted from urine and brought on the market as medicine on a large scale.
Besides water, urea is the main component of urine and is a decomposition product of converted proteins. A person excretes approximately an average of 25 to 30 grams of urea per day. We come in contact with urea at an early age, as a fetus in the womb. The level of urea in amniotic fluid, which consists for the most part of urine from the fetus doubles in the last two months of pregnancy. Before we are born, we drink well over half a litre per day of this liquid. The fetus also breathes it in; this is essential for proper development of the lungs. Scars disappear after an operation on a foetus in the womb due to the healing capacities of the urea in the amniotic fluid.
Bacteria are not yet active in the intestinal canal. Once we are born, the intestinal flora start to work, which have a special role in the conversion of urea. Scientists estimate that 25
Reply to
RoyJ
concentration of nitro-gen wastes, uric acids and other acidic substances in your urine, which are not helpful when rein-gested in these large amounts. A surplus of these substances in the blood can lead to an abnormally high degree of acidity. The body consequently acidi-fies, creating a breeding ground for illnesses. The above mentioned substances in high concentrations cause the urine to taste extremely unpleasant. If you wish to keep eating meat, the best meat prod-ucts are fish and fowl, free of hormones. Avoid foods containing refined flour products, white sugar and white rice. These nutrients also acidify the blood and body. Avoid processed & radiated foods, and foods which contain colorings or flavorings.
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Reply to
Rod Day

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