Re: HTP multiprocess machine?

> > > >
> > > > > > > I'm about 99% convinced to buy one of the new MTS 160 multiprocess
> > > > (MIG, TIG, Stick) welders from HTP America. I have some of their
> > > > other gear, and it's very good. The MTS 160 meets all my requirements
> > > > for power, size, price, etc.
> > > >
> > > > My only problem is, this machine doesn't have a foot pedal TIG control
> > > > -- it's strictly a rheostat on the case. The unit does have lift-arc
> > > > technology, which may make a foot control unnecessary.
> > > >
> > > > I've never TIG welded without a foot control before. Does anyone see
> > > > a problem here, or will I just have to adjust my technique? I don't
> > > > want to pass up a good machine solely because I'm ignorant, but i also
> > > > don't want to buy something i can't use.
> > >
> >
> > The trick to TIG without a foot pedal is properly setting your amperage
> > for each weld.
> >
> >
> > > Jon,
> > >
> > > Did you know that the TIG portion of this machine is AC only? Of
> > > course, the price is right at $1299.
> > >
> > > BTW, I have their 160 MIG unit, and absolutely love it. If the MTS is
> > > of the same quality, you won't go wrong.
> >
> >
> > I think you meant DC only.
> > Which means no aluminum, except DCEP, which I am not sure this one will > > allow.
> > If they feed the gas through the TIG torch power connector it makes it
> > a bit complicated to do DCEP aluminum.
> >
> > They haven't added it to their website yet.
> >
> > From this page
> >
> >
formatting link

> >
> > It doesn't seem like much of a TIG welder.
> > No more than any stick machine.
> >
> > HTP makes good machines, and chooses good machines to import.
> > I am pretty sure the MTS 160 is a Stel inverter made in Europe.
> > In fact here it is
> >
> >
formatting link

> >
> > Looks interesting.
> > I would be more interested in it for an inverter based MIG than a TIG. > >
> > No price listed.
> > How much are they asking?
> >
> Ernie - you are correct that it is DC only. They are asking $1299 for
> the machine and should have it in stock soon.
Not a bad price, and it would be unique on the american market, but for
a better multiprocess package I would recommed a Miller Maxstar 150 and
a readywelder spoolgun.
It would be more a TIG/stick machine, with MIG capability, and it would
run on 110v or 220v.
The whole package would be about $1500.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Loading thread data ...
Ernie - would this setup allow for aluminum TIG?
Reply to
Rick Chamberlain
No, but niether does the HTP Multi-process machine, since it is DC only.
You could do aluminum TIG using DCEP with a Maxstar 140 or a Maxstar 200, ( as I have done with both machines) but the Maxstar 150 changed to passing the gas through the power pin. This makes it harder swap polarity on the TIG torch. DC Aluminum TIG must be run in DC Electrode Positive polarity.
You could still do it on the Maxstar 150, but it means a messy torch gas hookup.
But if you have the spoolgun you can just MIG the aluminum.
Readywelders rock. I just finished assembling 180 feet of stainless steel railing using my Readywelder to MIG-Braze the tubes in. Pickets every 4 inches. great gun. I was running mine off my Betamig 250.
I have run my Readywelder from my Maxstar 200DX to weld aluminum, and structural steel. For the structural I was running 0.035" dual shield wire with C25 gas.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Ernie,
How does the ready welder handle aluminum? How are the welds compared to TIG welding?
Thanks, Rick
Reply to
Rick Chamberlain
The readywelder easily matches any other spoolgun I have used, and I have used them all.
Aluminum MIG welds willl vary in appearance whether you are running Globualr, Short Circuit, or Spray.
Globular looks a bit lumpy but is good for jumping gaps, filling holes, and building up areas. Short Circuit is best for thin materiels, and looks very much like a steel MIG weld. Spray tends to leave a smooth bead with no ripples.
TIG welds will almost always look better than MIG welds unless you get into pulsed MIG.
MIG is considerably faster than TIG, and does risk more distortion.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Earnie, which ReadyWelder did you do this with, the #10250 ?
Thanks.
Reply to
Mr Wizzard
Yes that is the one I have.
They use a standard Tweco front end so consumables are easy to find anywhere.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Earnie, which ReadyWelder did you do this with, the #10250 ?
Thanks.
Reply to
Mr Wizzard
Ernie, I think you've convinced me. HTP won't be shipping their new machine until July. One question: How does a Readywelder gun handle shielding gases? Does it use the source machine's gas solenoid, or does it have its own?
Thanks!
-Jon
Reply to
Jon Ward
I went ahead and ordered a Maxstar 150 and Readywelder for use as a MIG gun. If Readywelders are as good as Ernie says they are, the days of the 300-lb MIG welder must be numbered. I can actually find a spot to squeeze a 24-volt battery array into my work truck, so I should be good to go whenever.
Thanks for the input and discussion.
Reply to
Jon Ward
The Readywelder has it's own gas line with a 10 foot hose to get to the flow guage on the bottle.
The trigger in the readywelder is also the control valve.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
I had my reservations, but after reading Ernie's glowing reviews, I broke down and bought one. All I can say is damn, why the hell does Miller get big bucks for their spool gun???? I'm using my Readywelder with an older milllermatic vintage, welding mostly 6061, 6063 and 5052 and I am no longer clearing birds nests out of the welder every 10 minutes....Now I can actually make some money building signs.
erie
Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:
Reply to
eri

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.