Syncrowave Pulser available as add on?

Dear Group:
What are the odds of finding add on pulser controls for older syncrowave
250's or 351's?
Most of the used machines don't have the pulser option, but it would be nice
to be able to add one on.
The pulser just modulates the current so it must just be inserted into the
foot pedal circuit no?
Graham - Looking for a TIG in Vancouver, Canada
Thanks!
Reply to
Graham Parkinson
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The original Syncrowave 250 did not have an internal pulser option at all. It used an external inline pulser unit that Miller still sells called the PC-300. Miller charges a steep price for it.
The Syncrowave 351 used a panel mounted pulser. Both of the Syncrowave 351's we have at school have them. I believe the unit can still be ordered from Miller.
That is how the PC-300 works. The Syncro 351's pulser is more elaborate in it's installation.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
But remember, since the 250 & 351 are not inverters, the pulser is limited to a max of Dear Group:
Reply to
AMW
Richard
Does this limit of less than 25 pulses per second effect the usefulness of a pulser for welding thin materials i.e. does this kind of pulser allow freezing of the puddle while still giving enough heat without burning through?
I guess the noninverter models still have to work within the 1/30 of a second half period of the 60hz power supply.
- Graham
Reply to
Graham Parkinson
Higher pulse frequencies have a very different affect that low pulser frequencies. High frequencies make the weld puddle super-fluid, allowing very smooth flow welds, with no added metal.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Ernie
Sounds like the newer syncrowave 250's have optional built in pulsers. Would there be a retrofit kit for the late model 250's or 180's? Our local welding supply shop seems to know more about gases than about Millers' TIG welder options.
Thanks, Graham
"Ernie Leimkuhler" wrote
Graham Park>
The original Syncrowave 250 did not have an internal pulser option at all. It used an external inline pulser unit that Miller still sells called the PC-300. Miller charges a steep price for it.
.
Reply to
Graham Parkinson
I sold my old Syncro 250 a year ago to buy the new one with a pulser.
The only option for older machines is the PC-300 external pulser unit. Your best bet is checking eBay for a used one. New they are about $500.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Actually, a half cycle of 60 Hz is 1/120th of a second. AFAIK there is no fundamental electrical reason for a 25 pps limitation on the pulse rate of a mains powered transformer machine.
Gary
Reply to
Gary Coffman
Ah right - brain slip there. What I'm really wondering is what the pulser control on the newer a Synchrowave 250 does? I'm looking for a used 250 and most don't have pulsers so I need to understand better if the pulser will be essential for working with the thin aluminum on small boats etc.
Thanks, Graham
Reply to
Graham Parkinson
OK, to clarify.
A pulser allows faster welds on thinner materiels with less heat distortion. You will end up with a prettier weld, and a more consistent weld.
You do not NEED a pulser to make good welds, it just makes it easier, Especially for production work where you will be welding the same part or seam many times.
A pulser linked to a sequencer is the perfect set up for repetitive welds.
The new Syncrowave 250DX has the option for both. That is why I upgraded from my older Syncrowave 250.
Using the pulser and sequencer in my Maxstar 200DX inverter got me completely addicted to them.
If you buy an older Syncrowave 250, you can add a PC-300 pulser unit, or an Optima Pulser for full sequencer controls, but by then you might as well have bought a brand new Syncrowave 250DX.
Mine cost $1900 for the base machine. $200 for the pulser and $300 for the Sequencer. So for $2400 I was set.
The value of a very high pulse rates is to super liquify the weld puddle allowing smoother flow.
With an Inverter like the Dynasty 300DX or 200DX you can also vary the AC WAVE frequency up to 200HZ, which has another affect entirely. It allows you to focus the AC arc into a tight cone so it emulates a DC arc, which allows much better control of aluminum fillet welds. It also allows better penetration per amp of input than a transformer based machine.
I wish people wouldn't treat their first welder purchase like it was to be their last. I have purchased 5 TIG machines in 10 years. I started with a Miller Econotig. After 5 years I upgraded to a Syncrowave 250, and 4 years after that I upgraded again to a Syncrowave 250DX. 2.5 years ago I bought a Maxstar 140 for location welding. 1.5 years ago I upgraded it to a Maxstar 200DX.
Each time I was able to sell my existing machine for a decent price to finance the new one. Buy good machines, keep them clean and well maintained, and they will retain their resale value.
The only machines I haven't sold are my MIG machines. I bought a Hobart Handler 120 11 years ago, and a Hobart Betamig 250 6 years ago. They are both still going strong.
Buy a machine NOW that will allow you to do what you KNOW you need to do. Later on you will see if you need to upgrade or change machines to adapt to what you are doing THEN.
The best deal in small AC/DC inverters is he Thermal Arc Prowave 185TSW. Dollar for dollar it is an outstanding deal at $1600 complete. The best transformer machine on the market is the Syncrowave 250DX, even without the pulser or sequencer.
The ultimate TIG machine right now is the Miller Dynasty 300DX.
You can buy a Syncrowave 250DX or an older 250 and add a Readywelder Spoolgun for faster welds on simple assemblies.
If you need the versatility of multiple input voltages, then buy a Miller inverter. Nobody else in the world has anything to match Autoline technology.
The cheapest setup to weld aluminum boats would be a Miller Challenger 175, with the Spoolmate 2025 spoolgun. Or another option would be a Maxstar 150SD, and a Readywelder spoolgun.
Both end up around $1000.
Any other questions?
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Thank You Ernie - (Better than most professors....you actually saw the next questions coming!)
In addition to answering all of the pending questions that hadn't been asked yet, you also gave a freebie by mentioning running a Readywelder with a CC source like a syncrowave or Maxstar.
According to it's manual: The Readywelder will work on CC machines if you add external power for the spool drive. The only problem is on arc startup since the initial voltage is too high, causing a bit of a blast until the current stabilizes.
Thanks for the tip on the ThermalArc 185 too, it looks like a versatile unit, especially if it could run a spoolgun on DC. The ThermalArc only draws 29 Amps or 6.7 KVA at 100% (4KW) so I might be able to use it on the generator at our little island home. (repairing the community's aluminum ramp and other onsite fabrication etc.) Come to think of it, maybe just a Readywelder and some batteries would do for Al repairs.
I know I need the speed of a mig for the fabrication of our planned aluminum channel dock ramp but the little bit of tig welding I did on aluminum showed how controllable tig is.
I'll go back into the used equipment hunt now with a bit more of an open mind as to solutions.
The job I have right now is adding some height to the transom and sides of an otherwise excellent 13' welded Al boat - This involves welding a transom addition folded from 12 gauge 5052 over the old transom and stitch welding about 3" of 12 or 14 Gauge to the existing tubular gunwales and onto more tubes to raise the boat all around for safer service in the winter. I am planning on slotting the new tube to facilitate welding the strip in place and to aid in bending the tube to the curve of the boat.
I'm also partly financing this venture into Al welding by selling off my trusty Century 230 Amp AC machine - no complaints ever about this excellent buzz box.
- Graham
"Ernie Leimkuhler" wrote
Reply to
Graham Parkinson

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