Stick welding Sheet Metal

I've read through this newsgroup (and the metalworking one as well)
plenty of times, and I know this is a dead-horse type topic. But I
was hoping someone has a step by step web site on the finer points of
stick welding sheet metal.
I got the following...
1. low amps, small rod (1/16)
2. NO gap, tight, clean fitup
3. Move fast (2 inches per second was what one previous posted said)
can anyone add anything else? How great would it be if someone out
there has a FAQ for Stick Welding sheetmetal. (I've googled, but no
luck)
Thanks for any feedbacks.
Reply to
Alon Seal
Loading thread data ...
You didn't say how thin of sheet metal but you should be able to use #1 and #2 to get down to 22 gage non galvanized. 2" per second seems awfully fast, I doubt if you will be doing any fusion at that speed or even half that fast.
I'd try some sample beads on the material that you are looking at. I needed to do some work with 1/16" rod a week ago. Started at 30 amps, left the bead completely on top of the base metal, NO penetration. 35 then 40 amps to find a combo that would work for me.
Most of the welders do not have accurate amperage control at low settings, you will need to try samples. You are looking for penetration and flowout without burn through.
Much of the thin sheet is either aluminized (ok but.....), galvanized (not good at all!), or rusty (YUCK!) so make sure you are dealing with clean steel.
Al> I've read through this newsgroup (and the metalworking one as well)
Reply to
Roy J
Same problem here. I was told to set two sheets at 90 degrees correctly, tight, and then point them, every 2-3 inches about 1/4 inch of weld. This would limit distortion. Once the whole box is finished I could completely close of all corners.
But still looking for info, also specific for the current and rodsize...
tnks
g
Reply to
GijsWuyts
Well, I'm not sure of the gauge of the metal. I'm practicing using a hood from a late 90's Buick Skylark.
I am able to lay a bead on the metal, but it's when I do a lap joint that the top piece is all burn-through. I'd actually get a few spots that joins fairly well, but there'd be chucks burned off all around it.
with that, I'm moving around 1/2in per second.
Reply to
Alon Seal
Hood metal should be around 22 gauge or .025" Tough but doable.
1) Make sure the metal is clean, use 60 grit paper in a 4" grinder. Using a grinding wheel tends to take too much metal off. 2) Use 1/16" 6013 rod. Make sure it is reasonably fresh. You might want to drop down to a #9 lens in your helmet so you can see better. Put in a fresh outer lens cover while you are at it! It works better if you can see what you are doing. 3) Make a series of test runs on the solid metal. Try all the low amperage settings, 'A' & 'B' or 'Hi/Lo' heat ranges, different speeds starting in the 1/2" to 1" per second range. Look for nice flowout on the edges with NO burn through. Weld bead should be as flat as you can get it, but yours will likely be as high as it is wide. You will get nicer results with higher amperage and faster travel. Label each sample bead for reference. Keep in mind that the amperage settings at low amps are very machine dependent. Just because it says '40 amps' on your buddies machine that yours won't work better at 30 amps. 4) Tack weld a lap joint every inch or so, then hammer it flat with a hammer and dolly underneath. (Not TOO hammered so it gets distorted.) Make sure the cut edge is pressed tightly to the base stock. 5) weld the lap seam by running a nice bead on the solid metal right next to the cut edge, just ever so slightly overlapping the cut edge. 80% of the heat into the solid material. 6) PRACTICE!!!
Cheers.
Al> Well, I'm not sure of the gauge of the metal. I'm practicing using a
Reply to
Roy J
Roy,
Thanks for the reply.
OK, so I should not be aiming the stick at top piece, but more to the bottom? I have been sort of running the stick across both pieces.
________ | |___________ | | | | Top |x | with a hammer and dolly underneath. (Not TOO hammered so it gets
Reply to
Alon Seal
If you are using 6013, it doesn't really 'aim', it just takes the shortest route which should be mostly on the bottom piece. You are trying to 'weave' which works fine, just that you need to spend much more time over on the solid piece. Better yet is to get a puddle formed on the solid piece, do a quick weave over to the edge piece to let the puddle 'grab' the top piece, then run the bead on the bottom piece with an occasional quick trip to the top piece to keep the puddle merging with the top piece.
Hammering the top piece into the bottom will cause the top edge to be much less liable to burn back. If there is any gap underneath the edge, it gets too hot and just diappears.
Al> Roy,
Reply to
Roy J
One thing that I might add is try 6011 on ac or electrode negative. I have found that on many thin applications the fast freeze rods don't facilitate burn through as quickly.
Scott Young
Reply to
Young
Good thought. I'm just assuming AC machines. (slapping forehead!) 6011 and 6013 run very well on AC, better on DC. DCEN is the opposite of what is reccomended but it will keep the joint cooler and cut down on the burn thorugh.
Young wrote:
Reply to
Roy J
Just don't try that trick with 6010 on sheet metal.
6010 on DCEN is a truly amazing gouging/slicing rod.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
6010 on DC- reduces penetration (as opposed to DC+), it's used for beads on thin wall pipe when burn thru is a problem.
JTMcC.
Reply to
JTMcC
I'm confused.
1/8" 6010 DCEP at 200+A does make nice holes.
Since DCEN reduces heat on the electrode, I would think it would be less likely to burn through.
What did I miss?
__________________ Note: To reply, replace the word 'spam' embedded in return address with 'mail'. N38.6 W121.4
Reply to
Barry S.
I was refering to the practice of over amping 6010 on DCEN to slice steel and punch holes. Dip in water first to keep it from bursting into flame. I like to use 1/8" 6010 at around 250 amps.
It has quite an impressive effect.
Sorry if I confused.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
So 250A DCEN on a "wet" 6010 electrode does nice slicing and gouging? Got a picture?
__________________ Note: To reply, replace the word 'spam' embedded in return address with 'mail'. N38.6 W121.4
Reply to
Barry S.
Well nice is a subjective term; as nice as a nibbler no but it sure works nicely in a pinch.. Especially if you happen to run out of cutting gas on a sunday. I had the chance to cut up too 1/4" plate steel with this method.
You have to use a sawing action on thicker plates in order to get a half decent cut.
The cut is similiar to what you get while using a gouger but not quite as smooth; wish I had a movie as it can get interesting with all the metal flying about.
This technique is still taught in the Moncton college as well as a few others around Eastern Canada.
John
Reply to
John Noon
I guess the things that surprise me are:
1. Wet electrode 2. DCEN
Item 1: Don't wet electrodes start poorly? Item 2: Wouldn't you want more heat on the electrode as opposed to the work? DCEP..
The 1/8" 6010 at 250A I understand. You're throwing a ton of power at an already agreesive electrode.
__________________ Note: To reply, replace the word 'spam' embedded in return address with 'mail'. N38.6 W121.4
Reply to
Barry S.
If the electrode isn't wet when you start, it will go up in flames too fast. The water in the flux keeps it cool long enough to get some work done.
DCEN also keeps the eletrode from vaporizing as fast. On DCEP it would just ignite.
Ironworkers who use this on jobsites often keep some 6010 in a bucket of water just prior to use.
6010 actually likes moisture in the flux, as opposed to 7018.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Suppose you ran just 200A DCEP? (water dipped electrode)
__________________ Note: To reply, replace the word 'spam' embedded in return address with 'mail'. N38.6 W121.4
Reply to
Barry S.
Well, unfortunately, reversing polarity is not an option for my cheap welder.
I did practice a bit more this weekend, and must admit that I'm not getting decent result, yet. I found most of my work to be poorly welded. Good bead on the bottom piece, only a few spots on the piece. I think I was thinking too much about getting most of the weld on the bottom piece that I ended up being too far away from the top piece. (Perhaps I need a better angle, as well.)
I also tried doing "plug welds" (? where I drill a hole on the top piece, and try to weld through), and had some success. How big should the hole on top be? I was using a 1/4" drill bit.
I am waiting to get my "Spot Welder" attachment (Eastwood type) to see if that does any better. Ultimately, I'd like to be able to do some stitch welds on the sheet metal without any attachments.
SIDE NOTE: I experimented with folding the edge of the top piece over, in effect doubling the gauge of the material. (I know after hammering and grinding, it really isn't double-thick, but close enough.) I manage to get a pretty good weld that way. I may not be able to do this for every weld, but is this an acceptable workaround?
Reply to
Alon Seal
The arc isn't as controllable on DCEP.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.