Top ten gorilla welds I've seen

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Was out doing a property inspection today, and saw this. At first, I thought someone had heaped epoxy around the base, but took a closer look.
Any guesses as to what they used and did? I see lots of wire stubs, but with burnback at the TOPS. Someone really worked hard at this. There was an additional bracket added, meaning this glob did not work at all to hold the post to the base.
Just when you think you've seen everything .............
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Is that a copper pipe rising ?
Looks like it was never hot.
Martin
SteveB wrote:

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wrote:

"By gorry, that'll hold her......"
Cheers,
Bruce in Bangkok (bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
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Maybe a Mapps torch and clothes hangers. Did not get it hot enough to flow. Does not look like any MIG weld I have even seen, which would give the thin wire.
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maybe that was done by the guy that told me you could stick weld with a car battery.
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Stupendous Man wrote:

You can with carbon arc and wire
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I have a friend who has a good sized bank of industrial batteries (previously used as computer emergency power supply and obtained as scrap as they were replaced on a strict time in service basis) that he charges using roof mounted solar cells. He uses this battery bank for both stick and TIG welding as well as some other domestic usage more experimental than necessary as he is not 'off grid'.
IIRC he has the batteries wired through some kind of series-parallel switch to give him 3x126 (actually more like 40) volts for welding. He claims it is very smooth and it certainly is 'pure DC'. I doubt that he does much big rod work, but it is a good example of the application of alternate power.
Good luck, YMMV
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Private wrote:

My father used to have a device that held carbon rods that you strike an arc with and fed filler rods into (he used it with car batteries)
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Called "Carbon Arc Welding", and one of the ugliest processes ever.
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I seem to remember seeing them in circa. 1950 (mid years) Popular Mechanics for sale in the back. Reminded me of carbon arc lamps. Likely the idea source.
Martin
Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:

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Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

I recall a time when Dad used two carbon rods from "D" cells and a set of jumper cables (hooked to a car battery) to produce enough heat to re-solder a wire on a generator/starter commutator . Saved our weekend of skiing behind Uncle Bill's boat ...
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wrote:

In an auto rebuild shop during WW2 we used a single carbon with a handle. Connected the commutator to the battery with a strap and touched the carbon to the each bar near the wire to heat. The starter armatures were otherwise very hard to solder, because of the heavy conductors. I suspect that works better on 6V than on 12V as there was plenty of heat on 6V.
Don Young
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My dad described a similar setup he used for rebuilding batteries in the starter and battery shop he worked in just out of high school, soldering the cell connecting straps. I suspect that if you tried it on anything modern-made, it'd fall apart, last starter I worked on looked like the commutator had an injection-molded insulator, not mica with chevron washers, and all the connections were crimped/punched, not soldered.
Stan
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Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:

That makes the old 'Solid Ox' welds look good.
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Stupendous Man wrote:

No. Car batteries (3 in series) make much better welds than that.
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I could have done a better job with oxy/acet and a clothes hanger. Would never have tried it with just mapp.
(I used to be able to patch muffler walls with oxy acet and a clothes hanger)

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My dad (born 1918) told me that they used to use coat hanger rod and OA to do body work.
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Those were the days when the sheet metal was a little thicker then a soup can.
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coat hangers and steel wire for OA are about the same makeup.
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A buzzbox run off an inadequate generator?
Some of my first welds were that bad until I bought an adequate welder ($30, broken, but 225A).
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