Tried the 7018

Tombstone buzzbox , 1/8" rod at 120 amps on 3/16" steel plate . Some surface beads , an inside corner bead - all horizontal .
It likes a short arc , as y'all told me . What you didn't say is what a pretty bead it makes ! I had reservations when I saw that big ol' bead of slag . But when I busted it away , which was pretty easy , underneath was as nice a bead as I've ever laid . Did a bit of inside corner, and that was even prettier ! Nice slightly concave rippled bead with equal fill on both legs , great penetration , and not a bit of undercut at the edges . Now it may just be beginner's luck , but I just can't see the rep some have assigned to this rod . I was welding on a piece with light surface rust . I've read that restrikes are hard , so I tried it both with hot rod and with it cold - with the same rsults , no problem at all with striking an arc . Just gotta tap hard enough to crumble that shroud of shield coating that sticks out past the electrode itself . As long as I've had this rod laying around , I'm going to have to assume it's picked up some moisture . For that reason if I need to weld something that needs to be low-hydrogen it'll be with new rod . But for general around-the-shop welding I can see using it anywhere I'd use th 6011/13 series rods .
--
Snag
Learning keeps
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I think that some manufacturers rods are harder to restrike than others. I can remember some high strength rod that was a real pain. And of course I was making a lot of very short welds.
Dan
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If you actually strike/hit the metal with the rod, it is usually enough to break that glazing.
i
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I take it out of the rod holder and scratch it on the concrete or rough steel to break the glass slag covering. Lightly, tho.
Steve
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I get into trouble for doing that a lot too ;-)
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On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 22:21:26 +0100, Richard Smith wrote: <clip>

Nice tip, thanks. I tried it and it works great. Wish I heard that one about 40 years ago.
Glen
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There is a bold line between blame and responsibility. A lot of these people are just plain responsible for the thievery and deception they have committed. On both sides of the aisle. There are repercussions in responsibility. Not so with blame.
Steve
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Like Warren Buffett said, the deficit problem would have been solved, if a law required all Congress members to resign in any year when there is deficit.
i
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Guys - leave it behind when you come here.
Now - question... So 7018AC handles differently to 7018?
The few times I've used 7016 on AC it worked just fine and did what I wanted - tough welds and good positional welding for the gates / posts / other ironwork I was doing.
Richard S
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In my experience, I have welded pipe with 7018, and plate with 7018 AC. Both are iron powder coated rods, with 24 % of iron powder.
I'm a little confused. You have mentioned three different rods. You start out asking the comparison of 7018's, but then quote your experience with 7016, a completely different rod. The 7016 in my welding encyclopedia has a low hydrogen potassium coating, which would burn WAY different than either of the 7018's which have high % of iron powder coating. The 7016 shows no iron powder content.
I would like to hear from someone more familiar with the 7016. This is the first time I have even heard of them. From what I read, they are not even similar to a 7018.
Steve
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The similarity is that the flux-coating is based on the mineral limestone (calcium carbonate - CaCO3). CaCO3-based flux rods are known as "Basics" because the flux is chemically a "Base" (rather than "Acid") in chemistry. So there is a family, 7015 / 7016 / 7018 / 7028 which are all Basics.
7016 has no iron powder in the flux. You can make them with a thinner slag and they work well for rooting. You are not choking in slag down in the root.
Why always 7016 (will run on AC) not 7015 (sodium silicate in binder - will only run on DC) when iron-powder Basic flux is usually 7018 (DC-only) is a mystery to me - anyone know? For a high-value root you'd only ever root-run weld on DC, wouldn't you, so why a specifically root-running electrode like Filarc56S is 7016 not 7015 is something I've never understood.
That said, I've been glad that if you need Basic handling and properties when using a robust simple AC welding machine you can grab one of these root-running electrodes...
Richard S
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I need some 6010. I'll look to see if they have any small boxes of the 7016, and try some. Thanks.
Steve
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Hm, I have about as much welding rod as you
i
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I use so much, I buy it in 2# boxes.
Steve
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Want some milspec 99% "machinable cast iron" nickel rod? $10 per pound. Cost $37 per lb in stores.
i
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 10:54:08 -0500, Ignoramus29885

What diameter rod, and how much is it with shipping?
RWL
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On 2011-07-23, GeoLane at PTD dot NET <GeoLane> wrote:

5/32" diameter. Shipping is $11 regardless of quantity.
I have a total of 30 1 lb packs, and I am willing to sell up to 25 packs. I want to keep 5, even though I have other Nickel 99 rod. I am kind of like Gunner in this regard.
i
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 21:07:50 -0500, Ignoramus29885

A little big in diameter for me. I've never used anything over 1/8"
RWL
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On 2011-07-24, GeoLane at PTD dot NET <GeoLane> wrote:

You need a lot less current with Nickel.
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When I need this rod, it would pay its weight in gold by using it.

I had a few times, put some machine together from parts, only to find a buyer tell me that he will part it out.
i
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