"Water" welder

This welder is for sale on Craig's List. It uses distilled water and electricity to generate an oxy-hydrogen fuel mix. I can't justify the price
in terms of my need for another welder--I'm just a shop junkie. But I can't help wondering what this would be like to play with. I already have a couple of small to medium sized O/A torches.
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wrote:

Probably for making jewelry... Abrasha may know about it.
i
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Does anybody know what is in the additive to the water? I have one and do not know what is added. This would allow me to use the machine. As I remember the flame is very small and very hot and almost invisible.
TIA         Phredd
Leo Lichtman wrote:

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What I think happens is that you put water into a tank which has 2 electrodes through which electricity is passed. At one electrode hydrogen bubbles off, at the other electrode, oxygen. These gasses are kept physically separate and are collected and routed to a torch, where they are used as fuel gas. I have never heard of any additives. However, I only know about this anecdotally from a story told by a guy who was once teaching me chemistry, I've never seen or used such a machine. Sounds environmentally friendly, though, since you aren't creating any CO2 like you do when you burn regular fuel gas. (you just create water)
GWE
Fred May wrote:

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If the machine uses distilled water, it will ned some additive to get the water to conduct electricity reasonably well. It would be something that adds ions to the water, but ions that doesnt give any byproducts (for instance common salt would give chlorine gas). My guess would be sulphuric acid, at least that is what I use when teaching chemistry. Sodium sulphate might work as well, I´ll have to test that tomorrow.
How does the machine get any gas pressure? As for the environmentalness it depends on how the electricity is produced, if its produced by burning oil or coal we are back at square one...
Henning
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I had one a while back but never used it much so sold it on eBay. The water was in a sealed container, filled through a screw/washer arrangement, and there was a pressure switch on the water container. 12v DC was put across two small electrodes which produced the oxy-hydrogen mix until the pressure exceeded the switch setting, which then turned off the 12v. As I remember I never had to add anything to make the water conduct, so if anything was there originally it wasn't consumed. The Oxy-hydrogen mixture was bubbled through an external container into which you could put a 'modifier' - I believe mek methyl-ethyl-ketone was suggested. To give an idea of the flame size - the jet was a short hypodermic needle. These things are used by jewellers.
AWEM
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Potassium Hydroxide
Try these http://www.kingmech.com.tw/p3-1.htm http://www.mariodimaio.it/english/finitura/welding.html
And for fun there's Brown's Gas http://www.energyoptions.com/tech/browns.html
Mike H. Snohomish, WA
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Thanks guys I knew there was something added. Just couldn't remember how what. Now as soon as I have time I can get it fired up. I remember making up some n0.010, and 0.005< thermocouples with a water welder. Much appreciated.
Phredd
Fred May wrote:

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