Welding/brazing carbide and steel

molten glass . There's a glass bead maker here that wants me to make some rods for making the beads . The "working end" of these , that is in
I'll be getting more info from her when we get together next week , but would like to have some ideas in hand by then .
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On 4/30/2018 10:33 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:


"The temperature you should be looking for is the working range of glass. This is the temperature range between the softening point and the
proper personal protective equipment is needed when working with glass at these temperatures."
From: https://www.quora.com/At-what-temperature-does-glass-become-malleable-without-melting-In-addition-what-sort-of-tools-equipment-would-I-need-to-work-with-glass-this-way-and-what-materials-would-I-need-to-build-a-kiln-of-some-sort
"Brazing temperature In actual practice for copper systems, most soldering is done at temperatures from about 450 degrees F to 600 degrees F, while most brazing is done at temperatures from 1,100 degrees F to 1,500 degrees F."
From: http://thefabricator.com/article/arcwelding/brazing-copper-and-copper-alloys
There is a little gap there, but in reality there may be some overlap depending on how exactly the tool is used. It might pay to look for the highest temp brazing media you can find that is proven to work with steel and carbide.
I know nuthink. Seriously this was just using my search engine results based on my first thoughts on the subject. I'm sure you already did the same thing.
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