Welding on a truck

I have a scrapper with whom we have done a lot of stuff together (I sold him a lot of scrap, he sold me 625 Signode banding cutters, etc).
He has a truck (similar to Ford F-550) with a big steel "box" (5 ft tall) for hauling stuff. That "box" has steel doors in the back that swings open like a gate. Each door hangs on two hinges.
One of the hinges broke. It is a second time it failed. It failed before and was welded back rather atrociously. The weld looks very bad. It failed around the weld. The failed area is close to where the flat part of the hinge is welded into the gate.
The "big issue", in my opinion, is that the hinges are undersized for the sort of stuff that he hauls around, as evidenced by gouges from inside the box, etc.
I promised to fix it for him. I told him that if he continues o abuse these hinges, and drives with heavy things unsecured inside, they will fail again. Nevertheless, I feel that I can weld them in such a way that something will fail other than the welds.
Anyway, the purpose of my post is mainly to see if there are some non-obvious things that I am missing.
i
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Commercial haulers always overload their trucks. Always.
Beef everything up, larger hinges, larger mounts. It's the only way you can be sure he won't break them again.
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Fit a safety chain with tensioner from one rear side to the other outside the doors so in the event of hinge failure the car behind won't be flattened.
AWEM
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Andy, this is a really good idea. I will talk to him about it.
i
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wrote:

No charge !
AWEM
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You can buy 'weld on' hinges at any welding supply place. They are nothing more than a plate with a 1/2" pin on one side, a plate with a 1/2" hole on the other side. Something like $6 each set. MUCH stronger than what you have now.
Make sure you put the ground cable on the box (not the frame), and make it as close to the weld area as practical. Don't use the HF if the truck is new enough to have a computer.
Ignoramus12693 wrote:

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I would consider a different kind of design that would be resistant to damage.
___________ ___ __door_____|__| O | |_____________|
Above is a top view of a pivot rather than a hinge.
By using pivots you have several advantages. First you get the doors swinging clear out of the way while you are loading or unloading so the hinges can't get whacked.
Second the pivot are as beefy as you want to make them and rather than having the weight of the doors supported by the stamped out thin sheet metal. you have a large bearing area. It is easy to add grease zerks to this design also.
In the event of wear, you can replace pins and add washers to realign the doors. ( Make your pins from a slightly softer material.)
If it is desired to have a stronger door to pivot connection, you can mill slots in the pivots and weld inside the slots.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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On Oct 12, 7:34 pm, Ignoramus12693 <ignoramus12...@NOSPAM. 12693.invalid> wrote:> Anyway, the purpose of my post is mainly to see if there are some

If the hinges are insufficient for the task, perhaps advising him to up his insurance coverage for when they fail while he's driving it down the road and dumps something in the path of another motor vehicle? Some enterprising lawyer may also ask him who did the welding on said hinges. Sucks, I know, but it's the landscape of modern life.
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I would suggest a four to five foot long hinge pin with extra heavy wall pipe sections six inches long slipped over and welded alternately to door and box. To fail the pin would have to bend and peel all the pipe pieces off the box or door. Randy
snip>

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Ignoramus12693 wrote:

Cut some 1/2" pipe into 6" pieces, enough pieces to go from bottom to top on each gate, and weld them alternately to the gate and the box. Use a steel rod that fits the ID of the pipe and, voile, you have created a built-in piano hinge that should survive just about anything. I recommend that the pieces of pipe be stacked on the "pin" prior to welding to insure that they line up. It's a cheap and relatively simple, way to do it.
Jim Chandler
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Good idea - Might think of using a copper clad grounding rod as a center - and use it to align all lengths of pipe when welding. The copper might keep any splatter from welding to the rod.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Jim Chandler wrote: <snip>

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