Die Sets for pushrod threading

I remember seeing a add a while back (years?) where someone was marketing 3-56/2/56 dies for making one's own 2-56 push rods or
threading others. Also it seems like he had 5-40 /4-40 for doing 4-40 size. Anybody out there have a recollection on this??
--
Mike Gordon AMA 320990
Remember RC Pylon Racing, the ultimate thrill, when Sex and Drugs just ain't
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Inosol(?) better known as "ROD CHUCK". Yes, you do cut welding rods with a 3-56 die and then the 2-56 and the 4-40 starts out with a 5-40 cut before the final cutting. I finally got a set. I will send you info later.
Jim

ain't enough.

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Micro mark has a set, pricey though. http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Action Κtalog&Type=Product&ID153 Steve B.
Mike Gordon wrote:

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On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 00:58:41 -0500, Steve Boucher

Pricey indeed, particularly when half the sizes are utterly useless for most r/c control systems. Still, I 'spoze there's a need for a 3-48 threaded something.
It's a lot less expensive to buy a 5-40 die nut and a 4-40 die nut, and then go get a couple of pounds of 1/8" un-coated steel welding rods.
Micro Fasteners http://www.microfasteners.com/catalog/products/TNMDIE.cfm
carries hex die nuts for remarkably low prices. $3.15 each for 5-40 and 4-40. Stock numbers DIE04 and DIE05.
WAY cheaper than either "Rodchuck" or MicroMark. Cheers, Fred McClellan The House Of Balsa Dust http://home.mindspring.com/~the-plumber
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wrote:

&Type=Product&ID153
UH. . . . Why UN-COATED?
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Because you don't need the flux coating to cut threads for control rods. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
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http://www.rodchuck.com /
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Another method is to clamp the edge of the die in vise, chuck the rod in a large (slower rpm) drill, and "feed" the rod into the die while lubing as needed.
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On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 04:24:19 GMT, Mike Gordon

    I have been using 2mm bicycle spokes to make 2-56 rods. While they are somewhat hard cutting the diameter works and the wire is much stiffer than standard rolled thread pre made rods. Multiple passes with a split die work best.
John Hawkins - From Canada's Atlantic Coast http://rcalbum.rchomepage.com/Home.html
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------050106010400020601020009 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Thanks guys, i knew some one out there knew this.
John Hawkins wrote:

--
Mike Gordon AMA 320990
Remember RC Pylon Racing, the ultimate thrill, when Sex and Drugs just ain't
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I wouldn't. 2mm is smaller than 2-56, and stands a good chance of pulling out under load. I've seen it happen. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
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    I take strong issue with that. In fact you have to close down the die in order to avoid making it too tight. Refer to this picture
http://rcalbum.rchomepage.com/threads.jpg The upper thread, cut from a spoke, is .085" in majour diameter which is at the upper range of a class 2A fit while the thread on the Sullivan eye bolt has a majour diameter of .081" which is at the minimum end of the same class. AFAIK the Sullivan product doesn't have a history of failure. I certainly haven't had any with the spokes used over a number of years of use.
    Since 2mm = ~ .079" I assume the metal is worked up in cutting multiple passes.
    I don't know what you may have seen but I have every confidence in what I have suggested. Perhaps you are referring to flimsy ARF hardware.
On 24 Feb 2004 14:19:21 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Dr1Driver) wrote:

John Hawkins - From Canada's Atlantic Coast http://rcalbum.rchomepage.com/Home.html
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Then take issue with "Machinery's Handbook", The Industrial Press, by Erik Oberg and F. D. Jones.
In numerous places and charts in this 2000 page manual, they state that the major diameter for a standard 2mm threaded bolt, stud, or screw is .0786". They also state the major diameter for a standard 2-56 bolt, stud, or screw is .086". It's only a difference of .0074, but in this size, with nylon clevises, it makes a difference.

I was. However, if it's manufactured to industry specs, a 2mm thread will be smaller than a 2-56 thread. If a 2mm clevis is replaced with a 2-56 clevis, there will be a chance it will pull out.

And I have none. I'll stick to like threading systems and not risk my plane, property, or safety.
The diameter of the rod the threads are cut or rolled on is also specified. Of course, if someone is shade-tree engineering thread systems and cutting, anything goes. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
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On 25 Feb 2004 12:22:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Dr1Driver) wrote:

    Hmmm, who is talking about 2mm threads and mixing sizes? The ones I cut are 2-56 with a majour diameter of .085" are superior in fit to any of the pre made 2-56 hobby hardware I have examined.
    If I get a book with more pages do I win?
    
John Hawkins - From Canada's Atlantic Coast http://rcalbum.rchomepage.com/Home.html
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Only if the information is accurate. You are the one who mentioned using 2mm bicycle spokes to cut 2-56, or did I misread something? Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
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On 25 Feb 2004 13:29:25 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Dr1Driver) wrote:

    Hmmm...........perhaps the point? Suggested method produces a superior thread to stock hobby rods. The metal is worked up to the proper diameter in the process. Do as you like. I know what works for me.
John Hawkins - From Canada's Atlantic Coast http://rcalbum.rchomepage.com/Home.html
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I use a 2-56 die from K&S. Works OK, but is a carbon steel die, not high speed. Since it's a split die, I put it in a Vise-Grip with the split facing out. Chuck the rod (A piece of welding rod) in a variable speed drill, lube it up (I use Rapid Tap) and make a pass. Then tighten the Vise-Grip to squeeze the die and make deeper cuts. When it spins into a Sullivan 2-56 clevis, it's done. What you end up with is a rod that is bigger diameter than a standard 2-56 with tight threads. Later Bill

ain't enough.

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    For those who may be interested in techno babble about threads here are a couple of sources: http://www.katonet.com/Techinfo/Newsletter/2002/jul-aug-02.htm
http://www.engineersedge.com/screw_threads_chart.htm
John Hawkins - From Canada's Atlantic Coast http://rcalbum.rchomepage.com/Home.html
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I think Dubro or Carl Goldberg sells 2-56 dies.

ain't enough.

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Be careful. The pushrods you buy are 'rolled' threads which are Larger than regular 2-56. The metal Dubro clevises, etc., will be a loose and sloppy fit on threaded rods.

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