music wire landing gear

I have bent 5/32 music wire to shape for landing gear for a 4*40 with
trycycle landing gear. The wire was stiff when bending but after bent
to shape it moves out of shape eaisly. I understand music wire is good
to use,is it good to use for landing gear? I fly on a grass field. I
thank you for a response.
Reply to
rcroger
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I have bent 5/32 music wire to shape for landing gear for a 4*40 with trycycle landing gear. The wire was stiff when bending but after bent to shape it moves out of shape eaisly. I understand music wire is good to use,is it good to use for landing gear? I fly on a grass field. I thank you for a response.
Reply to
rcroger
When you say music wire, are you talking about the shiny chrome wire from China or are you talking about the stuff sold by K&S? When you bent it did you use a torch, or did you bend it cold? Did you use just one piece of wire per wheel, or did you use two wires coming together at the axle?
If you used single strand legs and they are too long, it will easily bend. I would think that using two pieces of wire per side would be about right for 5/52 on this size airplane.
Reply to
Robbie and Laura Reynolds
If it's the dull-colored wire sold by K&S, it's true heat treated music wire. If it's something you bought at Lowe's, no telling what it is. If you used heat (propane torch) to bend it, you pulled the heat treat out of it. Contrary to opinion here, you can NOT re-heat treat it in most home shop environments. Get a new piece of wire, and bend it cold. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
Reply to
Dr1Driver
So, by your comment, I would NOT be wise to attempt to braze the LG wires? Better to silver solder???
David
Reply to
David AMA40795 / KC5UH
Right. Whichever method you use, do it quickly and try to confine the heat to as small area of an area as possible. Unless you're proficient with a torch, I'd let a welding shop do it. I got my Dr.1 gear spot-welded (total heat time about 5 seconds) for $8 locally. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
Reply to
Dr1Driver
I find binding it with some very thin wire and then soldering works. The heat needed to solder is much less so it doesn't ruin the 'hardening and tempering of the steel'.
Reply to
freeda
Good method, too. Make sure you don't get gavlanized wire, solder won't stick to the zinc plating. Whichever method you use, scuff the wire with sandpaper so it's rough and shiny. For a job this large, I wouldn't use rosin core solder. I'd use solid solder and plenty of flux. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
Reply to
Dr1Driver
I have found thin brass wire to be the best, also as well as sanding the wire, clean it with a bit of surgical spirit. It is essential to get rid of all traces of dirt and grease. One thing I have found usefull are these little rubbery sanding blocks used to clean PCB's/Vero prior to soldering. In the UK you can get them from Maplins.
The main advantage of soldering is i) it requires little skill to get a good result, ii) it is very cheap.
Reply to
freeda

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