Newbie question about electric vs gas

user wrote:


A .40 glo 'trainer' is actually very tricky for an average newbie to fly, and its bloody dangerous in unskilled hands.
A slow stick by comparison barely has enough energy to destroy itself, let alone anything it smashes into. Everything happnes much more slowly.
I can understand the justification for anyne who knows nothing except 40 glo 'trainers' to insist that you go to a club and get instruction.
On the other hand, I cannot think of anything easier to lash together and get flying than a slow stick, nor see any reason why any competent individual can't - in halfway decent weather conditions - more or less get the basics done in an hour or two on one, totally unaided.
I would not have wasted a whole lot of time and money if I had known about parkflyers when I re-entered the hobby.
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learn" crowd keeps trumpeting their message. And then when someone says, "Well, I taught myself", the response is quite often "But yeah, that's very unusual" or "OK, but <you probably only THINK you know.
Your right Rich, there are many that have learned to fly on their own. I taught myself control line and free flight, (along with a few friends) before taking the plunge and joining a club to have someone teach me R/C. Back then, (1975) I spent all summer cutting grass and spent over $300 for my first kit, engine, radio. A lot of money for a 15 year old. The other side of the coin is there are a great number of individuals who try it on there own and give up after a few mishaps. Usually caused by a very simple "overlook" on their part.

that the hobby is harder than it actually

Hey, I have been saying for years, if you want to become a great pilot, stick a smaller engine in it, and take that darn gyro out:) rick markel
My Model Aircraft Home Page http://hometown.aol.com/aileron37/index.html
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On 5/17/2004 5:00 PM Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:

I think you are missing the point about clubs and instructors.
YES, a person can teach themselves to fly. It has been done many times.
The "gotcha" to being self taught is:
It is USUALLY a steep learning curve and can be quite frustrating (and expensive) while learning.
This is primarily due to not having a knowledgeable person available to make sure the plane and radio are set up properly and/or provide some BASIC guidance for using the controls.
Everyone learns at a different rate, and what comes easily to one person does not to another, but that doesn't mean they can not master the skill with some instructions. I am not even going to go into the safety aspects - I'll let someone else do that.
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I'm just going to interject something here, as the guy who asked the question in the first place.
I'm confident that having a club and an instructor would let me learn to fly planes sooner, and with less frustration, and possibly safer (although one *can* read about safety pretty easily).
I also KNOW that I prefer to spend my leisure time alone or in the company of my family. If a form of leisure that I'm considering *requires* being social, I'll generally choose a different form of leisure.
Your club may be made up of people who are varied, polite, charming, good-looking, and fascinating. They certainly will know more about RC aircraft than I will. And if someone who likes hanging out with other people, and who likes instruction/help/advice from experts wants to learn to fly, that person would be well advised to join your club, especially if flying sooner and with less frustration and lower cost are important to him/her.
But not everyone is like that.
Despite this quibble, I'd like to thank you all again for the informative remarks.
--John

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And you can USUALLY flatten that steep learning curve by choosing the right plane, good gear, using common sense, reading books, asking questions at your freindly LHS......even asking questions here....well sometimes ;-)..... So there is no "gotcha" to being self taught

This I can agree with.....but....if the person has some mechanical background and takes the time to find out about setting up the plane and gear ....no problem.
Mike
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Personally, I have to wonder if the attitude stems from

How true these words are and sums it all up Rich. I had interest in joining a club but backed off due to time and also were i would be flying my SS and other electrics most of the time. To me clubs are a good thing if you have time to go to the feild, fly glow or large electric, and deathly afraid of flying for the first time........thats about it. R/C flying is easy to do if you use common sense.
Mike
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Don't forget the safety in numbers thing too. Club fields have usually sorted out local interference issues and are far enough away from other clubs too. If you choose to fly near enough to a club to interfere they will NOT be happy if you shoot them down. The reverse may be true too!
Just take care to check out the area first.
--
Steve

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Steve wrote:

Conversely the palce you are most likely to get shot down at or have a mid air is of course a club...and the place you are most likley to do property damage to some person or his vehicles is of course a club...
We've been through all this before. As long as you don't fly more than 1/3rd the distance to someone elses transmitter on the same channel, your model will almost reliably respond to your transmitter, not his, and vice versa. If you can't see em flying, you are almost certainly far enough away.
Clubs are necessary, becasue glo planes are noisy, need runways, and a special place to fly. because there are many transmitters and planes and spectators gathered together, you need safety rules of a fairly stringent bnnature, and because the risk of an accident goes up roughly as the square of the number of modellers present, you need insurance as well. The only upisde is you get to chatter to fellow madmen.
All the advantages are actiually with the solo flyer in a remote spot flying something less aggressive.

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Our official club motto (on the cover of every newsletter) is "Be Safe, have fun and don't have too many rules!"
We have one official business meeting every year and a 2 work meetings at the field. Pretty simple....pretty club too!
Wiz
Paul McIntosh wrote:

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John F. Hughes wrote:

Unless you spend a little more on the electric, teh gas will outperform it. However this is not an issue with sport models.
Use of LIPO cells (very feasible at this size, and not expensive) will net you a plane that is very similar in weight and power to a glo.
24" is small tho - its either going to be fast, or VERY light. I am flying 26" span electrics on 15W power units.

Not really. Its just a tendencty to build over weight overpowered glo planes. If you want a model that will handle wind, 26" span is not it...
You need about 50" span, and 3-4lb weight. Very doable on .25 glo or speed 600 sort of electric power.

Theres prop noise and tehre may be gearbox noise and some motor noise as well. Quietest are direct drive outrunners - multi-pole morirs that rev slower.

For electrics, its generally 3-5 minutes for Nicads, 5-8 minutes for NiMh cells, and 10-40 minutes for lithium polymer.
Moving away from what you are directly asking, to what I think you really want to know....
...If you want a trouble free modelling experience flying off small local fields with slower lighter models, then something in s the speed 400 class electric preferably equipped with lithoum polymer batteries for decent duration, is absouletely spot on. 36-45" span and 17-23 oz is the norm. The advantages are local field flying, no slime, quiet, and not horrendously expensive. The disadvantage is a flying speed more like 25mph than 40mph, and it does nothing to teh size of your penis.
...if you have a good club field and friendly flyers close by, a standard .25 to .40 model weighting 3-5lb and in the 50-70" span range will over you huge penis size increases, a flying speed in teh 30-40mph range and fast turn round times between typically 6-15 minute flights.
You WILL need a take off and landing strip - these models are nearly always too fast to reliably hand launch - and somewhere where noise is not an issue. Price is SURPRISINGLY comparable by the time you have added up all the anicillary bits you need to go in the flight box of either.
Esdentially its a style choice, and not as irrevocable a one as people like to say. If you have (as I do) suitable flying sites for smaller electric models within walking distance, its a bit of a no brainer. I just wait for calmer days.
OTOH if you have to make the trip to a club field anyway, there is very little to choose. Bigger electric models of comparable performance to a 40 glo ARE more expensive.
I prefer electric, and have ended up spending more money for the convenience of flying where a glo plane is simply not feasible.
If you DO go electric, the one thing worth spending money on is decent lithium polymer bateries and a suitable charger. Those batteries at one stroke lift the models perform,ance from 'adequate' to 'very enjoyable' ...power to weight approaches and may even exceed glo power at sensible (>6 minutes, usually 15) duration levels. With more power avialable at lighhter weight, there is not so much presure on the motor and a larger cehaper one is often as good as spending hundreds of dollars on the latest brushless screamer, but staying with cheaper batteries..

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