ok everybodys input on new plane!!!

ok so after doing some research,and reading about 100 bad reviews about megatech I canceled my order of my freedom flyer. Now I gotta choose
something to replace it. Cant exceed 200.00, must be rtf. Like I said my local store has aerobird. I feel i would grow out of a begginer slo plane. What about a j3cub? or something along those lines. I need input tonight as I either ordering tonight or heading to the store in the morning. THanks Guys Luke
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The electric version may be tame enough for a beginner.
The closer it is to scale, the harder a J3 is to fly:
    long wings     short fuselage     barn-door ailerons     flat-bottom wing     narrow landing gear     tail-dragger     small rudder
Trainers look a lot like Cubs, but their proportions are subtly and significantly different.
                Marty     
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i ordered a megatech freedom flyer and have read tons of mixed reviews and its driving me crazy. Luke
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Crap. The J3 Cub is the only taildragger plane that I have, in 15 years as an instructor, recommend as a trainer.
I've often said, "If you can't fly a Cub, you shouldn't be flying."
The Cub is one of the most gentle planes in the air (Old-Timers and gliders not withstanding). It's very forgiving, easy on the controls (the clipped-wing version is aerobatic), slow flying, easy to land and fairly easy to take off.
A taildragger is no more difficult to take off than a trike style, provided the gear is set up properly.
Long wings lend a glider effect to the plane. The fuselage is short, but the moments are in proportion. Nothing wrong with barn-door ailerons on a trainer. Most trainers have flat-bottom wings. The landing gear isn't that narrow and not so tall; but I guess nothing is, compared to a Fokker Dr. 1. See taildragger comments above. The rudder isn't really small. It's just that the horizontal stab is disproportionately large.
I have and will heartily recommend a J3 Cub, especially in the larger sizes, as a suitable and effective trainer for a novice.
Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
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On 24 Jan 2005 02:23:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Dr1Driver) wrote:

A challenge to newbies.

And adverse yaw.

Adverse yaw.

Most modern trainers cheat with a little camber toward the leading edge.

The Cubs with which I am familiar are prone to ground-loop both on landing and on takeoff. You've got to be on the rudder all the time (a function, in part, of the small rudder area and short fuselage, plus the narrow gear).

OK. People of reasonable intelligence and good will often disagree with each other.
                    Marty
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(Dr1Driver) wrote:

provided the

No its not....I learned off of tailtraggers and will continue to fly them.

Gee, sounds like all the special ingredients to make a good trainer
Mike

sizes, as

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Boy. I've seen guys fish for an argument before, but they are usually more suttle than you are DR1.
Phil AMA609
Dr1Driver wrote:

years as an

gliders not

clipped-wing
take off.

provided the

nothing is,

sizes, as

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Go for a GWS "Slow stick"

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eculuke wrote:

Consider a trainer as your "baseline" plane, not just a ticket to punch, but a relaxing break from aerobatic models and the "hover monkey" crowd.
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Get an Easystar, it's a pusher prop, bit bigger than an Aerobird. Do
search, it's very popular. Will fly in more wind than a Slow Stic
-- Solca ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Solcat's Profile: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/member.php?action=getinfo&userid%67 View this thread: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?threadid2627
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Hitec Sky Scooter Pro II.
--
Dan
AMA605992
  Click to see the full signature.
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You will definitely grow out of a beginner slo plane, but you'll probably NEVER grow into something more advanced, especially if you plan on trying to go it alone.
But, you know better... Go ahead and get yourself that hot rod P51, smash it into a million pieces 2 seconds into the first flight, go home pi$$ed, blame us for leading you astray, and quit the hobby.
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Untrue

Very untrue

I never get pi$$ed or blame anyone..........I just keep practicing till I get it right. ;-)
Mike

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I *really* don't get it. A few months back, I asked a few questions here about starter planes for antisocial people like me who don't want to join a club, etc.; I got flamed left, right, and center, told I'd crash in the first 20 seconds and go home crying, etc.
Well, I bought my 8-year old son a Scout, let him spend a bunch of time learning to handle various 4-channel planes on FMS, and then told him about the difference with a 2-channel like the scout.
We went out on a cool afternoon with 0-3kt breezes and a large open field, tested the radio, etc. I warned him that the plane might well crash and break into bits, but that I thought that if he handled it carefully, we'd probably be able to patch together any damage done.
Then I said "For the first flight, I want you to just apply full power until the plane rises a *little* in the air, then cut back gradually until you glide to a landing. DON'T TOUCH the left-right control."
He did so, but the "reduced power" reaction of the scout was to pitch down a good deal, and he nosed into the snow. We picked up the plane, wiped it off, and did it again...and again. After 4 or five times, he had it pretty well figured out, and could apply power just before landing to keep the nose up. Then we did some large rectangular flights; then the battery started to die, and we quit.
Right there we'd gotten our $75 worth of fun. We've gone out a couple more times since then. He still tends to favor bang/bang control (full-on, full-off), but is learning to value subtler motions. We flew out on the local highschool field last weekend and he just about managed to get it through the goalposts on his last flight.
Maybe this Spring we'll build ourselves a Wally Wing or something, maybe even wind our own CD-drive motor for fun. Maybe not. But I don't think that this experience has particularly ruined either him or me for the hobby.
But maybe one of you folks out there can explain to me why I was an idiot to spend such a lot of time having fun with my son, figuring out something together, rather than going to a club ...
[Yeah, I know...insurance. Well, my circumstances were a little unusual: during our first flights, there was no one else within miles, so I felt pretty safe...]

If you say I *have* to, maybe I'll do that. But I *think* the route I took was more rewarding, no?
--John
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I made my first attempts prior to using fms. Let me just say that the simulator mad all the difference. No patience/schedule for an instructor or funds for club initiation fees.
I don't know why there are so many club overtones. Surely some just want to see a newbie crash a new plane without having to get up ;) I think honestly people have different conceptions about RCing, as evidenced by the assertion that your first plane would be a p51. Instead it was a $50 electric that borders on disposable.
It does get more dangerous with gas, and I think a number of people assume that is where newbies are starting and thus envision lots of chopped up fingers and planes sticking out of peoples heads. But something like a scout can teach you respect for a prop with a lot less risk than most any gas engine.
Here is a $60 foam electric a10 with small ducted fans which is about the safest approach to RC'ing there ever was and it should survive most computer simulator assisted learning curves: http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXJEE5&P=7
You'll need some lightweight radio gear to put in it. I found an a10 fms model online also, dont remember where though.
wrote: ...

That's a tough one, If I can even talk to another person for 5 minutes without getting into a fight then it is a major accomplishment ;) Clubs aren't for everyone, but being able to work with other people is a skill in and of itself, and some may find that rewarding, if not downright useful.
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wrote:

I love my club. I tried to learn on my own as a boy and got no help from the club I joined. When I came back to the hobby in middle age, my teacher and my club gave me a lot of joy. YMMV.

Agreed. Helping to run a club is a different hobby from flying RC aircraft. Some enjoy it, some don't.
                    Marty
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check out http://www.spadtothebone.com Less Money. Less Work. Less Fear. More Flying
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check out http://www.spadtothebone.com Less Money. Less Work. Less Fear. More Flying
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You know i tryed to learn on my own the frist three planes I had hite the ground very quick. So i gave up on the hobbie and went back to RC Cars for the next 10 years. I still wanted to fly it just looked like so much fun but it was a big cost when thay hite the ground and you had a bag of fire wood to take home. So i found a club that had people that would help me with the learning steps i needed to fly. I found a great bunch of guys at a club in Columbus GA AMA Club 217 thay took my new avistar looked it over and then took it out for the frist flight. The plane looked like a eagle in the air to me it was great just looking at a plane that was mine in the air and not coming at the ground LOL. The next week i was ready to start my training i had a guy that was about 17 years old that was going to help me learn. The frist time i was at the controls he said i did very good. but i was scared out of my mind LOL After three weekends i did what i had been trying to do for a long time i took off and flew the plane with out the buddy box and made a real nice landing i did this four more times that day with my trainer close by. The next day thay turned me loose with the plane. And i have been having the time of my life for the last 5 mo's i have crashed two plane that will never be put back togather again. most of the crashes was from just not knowing what to do at the time i need to do it. but i have made some real bad landing and a lot of real good ones. the more i fly the better i get. So if you dont know and don't have anyone to help i would say get a small electric plane and learen from it. before you try the bigger gas planes.

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