Opinions needed on old plane

To all-
I have a couple of questions about a old plane I bought at auction at a
local club.
It seems to have the electronics in it. It has three futaba servos (the
plane resembles a sig kadet in shape)
The Futaba receiver is FP-R114H. Does anyone have any information on
it?
The engine is a OS Max FP. Is this a good one? Any comments are
appreciated.
I paid $25 dollars for the plane and it is in great condition. I
figured it was a good one to train on.
I switched the receiver in it and put in a new JR Quattro receiver, but
I get no response. I do not see
a battery anywhere, should I have one to power the receiver?
I am new to this and I am finishing an electric version of the Sig Rascal,
so this is my first gas plane.
Any comments or opinions are a big help.
SV
Reply to
Vallone
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| It seems to have the electronics in it. It has three futaba servos (the | plane resembles a sig kadet in shape)
Well, a Sig Kadet is a good trainer, so ... | The Futaba receiver is FP-R114H. Does anyone have any information on | it?
It's an AM receiver. I believe it's what came with the Attack 4 AM radio, and it's an OK receiver. Not great, but OK for a trainer.
Does it have a `1991' sticker on it, or a gold AMA sticker? We want to make sure it's narrow band. I suspect it is, but they've been around for at least 13 years, so we should check.
It certainly won't work with your Quattro transmitter, but will with an AM transmitter. (I don't think AM radio gear has the positive/negative shift issue.) If you use a buddy box with it, you'll need an AM buddy box if you use that receiver and an AM transmitter.
| The engine is a OS Max FP. Is this a good one? Any comments are | appreciated.
Not a great engine, but not a bad one.
| I paid $25 dollars for the plane and it is in great condition. I | figured it was a good one to train on.
Assuming the equipment all works, you got a great deal. Assuming that all the electronics and the engine are shot, it's still a good deal if the airframe is good.
| I switched the receiver in it and put in a new JR Quattro receiver, | but I get no response. I do not see a battery anywhere, should I | have one to power the receiver?
Yes, you need a battery :)
Four cell NiCd or NiMH. You sure you don't have one lying around? The odds are good that your Quattro radio came with one, or at least a holder for 4 AA cells. (Which I wouldn't suggest flying with, but it's OK for testing.)
Reply to
Doug McLaren
Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:
You may also need to change the wire order on the servo plug. Here is the URL for the servo wiring http://www.fatli>
Reply to
Ted Campanelli
If he really wants to go on the cheap, and the RX range checks ok with a Narrow-Band TX, go for it. No requirements that the RX be narrowbanded, just good sense. So go with the old RX, and if its OK with the local flyers, grab the Freq. Clips for the band on each side of the number your Radio is set to, just to be safe.
Personally, I thought the Airtronics single conversion RX to better than that era Futaba, but both could get an airplane up to 'Dot in the Sky' altitudes, where eyesight, not Radio, was the limiter in controlling the plane ** mike **
Reply to
mike
| Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not | so great) words of knowledge: | | You may also need to change the wire order on the servo plug. | Here is the URL for the servo wiring |
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I've got a FP-R114H receiver in my garage. It's wiring is the same as modern R/C equipment.
As for being narrow band, Mike is correct that even a non-narrow band receiver will still work (even with a narrow banded transmitter), and that taking extra channel clips will protect you from other R/C fliers, but don't forget that there are other users of the spaces between our channels (like pagers, wireless microphones) and your RX would pick up their signals too.
Yes, it's legal to use a non-narrow band RX (but you can't legally use a non-narrow band TX) but it's sort of dangerous. You'll still get a similar amount of range, but it'll be much more succecptable to interference.
I suspect that most or all of the FP-R114H receivers _are_ narrowband already. But I'm not certain. This set of questions might help verify that it is :
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The FP-R114H is in their list, so I'm guessing they are all narrow band.
And there's nothing wrong with AM receivers. They still will let you fly the plane further away than you can see.
Reply to
Doug McLaren

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