Question on electric

Hi folks
Simple question. How can you tell if you can change a plane to electric from gas ?
Martin Poles

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Mainly it's a matter of wing loading. You can't effectively strap on enough batteries to overcome a heavy airframe, like you can bolt on a bigger engine.
Try the forums at www.ezonemag.com for specific conversion info.
PCPhill

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martyp wrote:

Almost certainly if you send enough it can be done, but gas planes are bult heavier, cos its easier to do it that way, and they need to withstand a lot of vibration.
That, plus the extra weight of the batteries, may make an already not spectacular model into a tip stalling underpowered nightmare.
Unless there is good reason, if its alreadt built, don't bother. If its an ARF, it can be done. If its a kit or plan, and you are prepared to work on lightness, its good.
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If you have a previous gas model with afair amount of wing area versus weight of the airframe, covering and paint, it may be practical to convert to electric power. For example, a 40" or bigger wingspan J3 Cub that was built reasonably light can ROG and fly on a geared 2.3:1 Speed 400 6volt motor and nine 600AE or 500AR batteries using a 9X5 prop. If it was built heavy, it will fly faster /less scale-like. A previously glow powered WWII type scale low wing fighter of 55" span would require much a more powerful i.e. expensive motor and battery pack to fly and might have to fly a little too fast for comfort to avoid tip stalls, etc. due to total weight of batteries, etc. People who convert gas model fighters to electric power usually start from a new kit and build in as much lightness as possible. There are many smallish WWII fighter kits designed for electric power. They usually are hand launched or catapult launched and have no landing gear to reduce weight and belly in on landings. Large high performance electric powered fighters are appropriate for people with advanced electric experience and big wallets. There are a lot of semi scale molded foam electric Park-flyers like the GWS P51 Mustang and Zero fighter. These have undercambered wings for slow flying in small spaces . If you are interested in electric, register on E-Zone, read various columns and ask questions.

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The reason I was asking is that I would like a small scale model of a Cessna and think it would give me more places to fly if it was electric i.e. less noise. I have been looking but seems all the great looking ones use fuel.
Martin Poles
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martyp wrote:

Hmm. Then its time to grab teh modelling kniofe and build...or accept a less than good looking one.
Fortunately the Cessna is easy enough to convert to electric if you want to pick a gas kit.
It will carry a big battery load and won't need huge amounts of power to fly respectably.
Go to the ezone and ask again.

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When you say "small" I don't just how small you are looking for. If interested in 40" or so WS, 1/2 A size you may want to look at some of the models here. www.hobbyhangar.com
They don't have a Cessna but they do have an Aeronca Champ and a Piper Super Cruiser that build into very nice electrics. These are laser and CNC cut kits. Very nice.Hope this helps.
Ken Day
On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 00:42:22 GMT, "martyp"

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jbourke wrote:

Hear hear!!
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