Switch to Electric?

wrote:


I haven't heard.
Drat. I should have copied the URL for the model's test flights. It might have more details.
The model has to come in under 11 pounds for FAI competition, of course.
            Marty
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You are right, Marty. I forgot about the eleven pound limit.
Ed Cregger

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Q500s are in the 180mph range and the old F1s were well past 230.
-- Paul McIntosh Desert Sky Model Aviation http://fly.mcintoshcentral.com
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On Wed, 6 Aug 2003 21:30:14 +0000 (UTC), "Paul McIntosh"
I think someone suggested that six or seven sets of batteries were in the $4000 to $5000 range (retail). Jason is probably getting some sponsorship.
                    Marty
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Some notes gleaned from the beginning of the video:
Hacker C50 13xl
Geared 6.7-1 20x13 APC prop
10S4P-2100 Thunder Power LiPoly Cells
65 Amps
11 lbs
200 watts/pound
My apologies if I have transcribed anything wrong.
                Marty
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Marty and others here are some prices. Look below.

$399 http://www.aircraft-world.com/bargains/hm-prices.htm $212.50 Speed controller Hacker HM 77-3P Opto http://www.aircraft-world.com/products.asp?id (

$20 each?

2 packs of 5S4P ($325 each) $700 http://espritmodel.com/accesories_batteries.html#LiPol
> 65 Amps No charge....<grin>
That's $1311.50 for the power system without the charger. The charger will cost another $329 Orbit Micro Loader Pro http://espritmodel.com/accesories_chargers.html But now his fuel is nearly free.
What does a Y.S. 1.40 DZ with pipe and anti vibe mount cost? How much dose a serious pattern pilot spend on fuel? Can you see where this is leading? Now add to that the wear and tear vibration causes on the airframe and electronics and it isn't hard to understand why electric power is an attractive alternative. Plus, you can kiss good bye mixture settings, glow plugs, flameouts, noise, mess.....What's not to like?
I have no idea what Jason's airframe costs but I doubt it's significantly different that a Y.S. 1.40L powered version of the same airframe. Radio components should be exactly the same.
One thing people didn't mention is that the "light weight" and "high energy storage" of the LiPoly batteries is what this is possible for Jason. Just a year ago or so most electric planes were heavy and flight duration did suffer badly compared to glow power. Technology is a wonderful thing.....embrace it guys. Someday we may all have to fly electric planes in order to keep our flying fields.
Wiz
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Moe Blues wrote:

I'd question the former actually with Lithium technology. The latter is still sadly very much the case.
However show me the glo engine that you can totally stop in flight and restart...or a glo plane I can fly for 20 mins and land in 10m of back garden...

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Show me an electric that can fly 500 miles and stay aloft 24 hours (FAI restrictions!)
--
Paul McIntosh
Desert Sky Model Aviation
  Click to see the full signature.
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You can definitely find (or build) models that handle wind with aplomb. I've flown my Crazy Max in winds up to 25 mph (it stands still, and you have to land with full throttle--but it's a blast). Most Speed 400 models will easily handle winds of 20 mph or greater. Just stay away from slow-flyer types and you should be able to handle your ambient winds with no great difficulty.

Depends on the model. For Speed-400 types, you'll probably want a smaller, lighter receiver and some micro servos. Check out Balsa Products (www.balsapr.com) for some great prices and good deals.

To get that to fly, you're looking at a fairly expensive setup--probably a cobalt motor or brushless with gear drive and lots of cells. A better bet would be to look at an electric ARF that matches the size and performance you're looking for (instead of trying to convert a glow model). Check out Hobby Lobby, Hobby People, or even Tower for some examples.

Depends on the motor you're using. I can fly my homebrew FlyRod for almost 20 minutes on an 800mAh pack. The same pack only lasts about 10 minutes in my Speed 280 Twin.

I have a bunch, but my favorites so far are the Astro 110D and 112D. As has been said, this is one place you DEFINITELY shouldn't scrimp. A crappy charger produces poorly charged batteries, which in turn produces poor airplane performance. Put your money here.

How much money do you have? ;)
Seriously, you can spend oodles of dollars. I prefer cheap, so I'll offer the following:
Simple direct-drive Speed 400 model Motor: $9 Three 8-cell 600AE packs: $48 Pixie 20 Speed Control (from Castle Creations): $35 Astro charger: $125
Approx. total: $217
With that setup, you can fly full-house aerobatics all day long.
Add a gear drive ($15) and your range of model sizes goes up nicely.
If you need a small receiver and micro servos, add another $100--though you can certainly find excellent receiver/servo combination deals for much less.
Moe

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Check out this plane
http://rcgroups.com/links/index.php?t=article&cat 8&idB14
I think Mountain Models also has a new fully aerobatic electric out. Maybe called the tornado or similar.
John VB
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snip ........ and the frequent need to tune the engine which I do not do well.............
I have run a full gallon of fuel thru my Magnum .61FS during the last couple of months, and have touched the needle valve ONCE during that time.
Most people who fiddle with the needle valve do so needlessly!!!!!
David
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If you are experienced enough to recognize how the engine is running without adjusting the needle valve, then what you have done is okay.
On the other hand, modelers should check their needle valve setting at the beginning of the first flight of the day, if they care about engine longevity.
I tried to teach my student pilots to care for their engines and I had them do this enough that it became automatic for them to ensure that their engine was tuned properly.
Granted, four-strokes do not need tuning as often as two-strokes, but better safe than sorry.
The only way you can get good at doing something is to do it.
Ed Cregger

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Electrics can certainly fly in the same conditions as glow/gas planes. Call up ModelElectronicsCorp.com and give them the specs of your plane, he can give you a recommended motor configuration. He helped me out with a Mega Motor brushless set up and it flew better than the glow version. The only thing I don't like is that on landing the electric, it doesn't have enough power to taxi back home through the grass. So I get a little exercise if I don't do a good landing.
--
Normen Strobel
snipped-for-privacy@zoominternet.nospam.net
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I specifically bought my Wingo to fly here at home, though I will perform the initial flights at the flying field, just to make sure all is okay. Especially when loaded with the video setup.
Flying at home is the niche I see electric fitting into for me. At least for now. Who knows what may come? I still love my IC engines and see no reason to give up one for the other.
Ed Cregger

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Ed Cregger wrote:

Hi Ed. Thats why I started, for sure.
But then I hit teh e-zone, and realised there was so much more possible.
What you find with electrics is that actually, unless you want utter ballistic performance, motors are very cheap ($5?) Its the controller and battery that cost more, but hey, lets say you want to build a 4 engined Lancaster or B17, that won't quit on you...thats $20 on the motors, and maybe $60 on a controller and battery pack...you won't get 4 reliable totally throttleable won't quit on you .10 cu in glo engines for $80....
So multi-engined scale is definitely better done electric. In fact most scale stuff is good on electric, except maybe those big WWII warbirds.
Likewise camera planes. Want to get rid of vibration? Shut the motor off and fold the prop?
Likewise thermal soaring - heck the sailplanes need ballast anyway, might as well put some battery in, and strap a motor on the front.
Also ultra slow lightweight stuff - far easier to do with a GWS system, and you can have a WWI biplane you can fly out of the backyard.
What you find is that you can fly more places and more often, and you don't burn gas getting to the club field.
Sure, if you like to do that, do it! You will need a runway for that ultra fast ducted fan jet anyway, or that giant scale B17.
But for pure 'charge it up and chuck it into the air and land in teh backyard' electric is where its at.
Its different. If, like me, you cut your teeth on stick and tissue and rubber bands, its how it used to be but with radio as well. Just for fun. Not trying to be fatser/louder/bigger/than the other guy - just the sheer fun of building things that fly.
AND if you do buy expensive, you can always swap packs and controllers and motors between models to get the best out of them - lets face it do you take 20 models down to fly? Nope. Just the 4 or 5 that suit the weather and how you feel on the day.

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HA!
    I just returned from a fly in, where I "DUSTED OFF" 3/4 of the models there with my electric Cloud Dancer..
    Unlimited vertical.. and I have flown it in the same winds as any .40 - .60 powered model with no problem...
    And this plane can outclimb my .90 powered Extra and easily do continuous loops at 1/2 power. (almost said 1/2 throttle! - SHAME on me! ) :)
    Dave
wrote:

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So, what did you have in it? I can easily say that NO electric commercially available has demonstrated the same performance as my YS .91 powered Ballistick. -- Paul McIntosh Desert Sky Model Aviation http://fly.mcintoshcentral.com

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Paul,
You need to get out more. There are commercially available ARFs now that can do things your Ballistick won't. Unlimited vertical. 20-minute duration. Complete 3-D manueverability. And you can hold the fuselage vertical, push the throttle up, and watch the model rise straight up out of your hand.
I remember only too well when electric models where little more than (under)powered gliders. Today's models--Gary Wright's E3D, the Mountain Models Tantrum, the NSP Mambo, even the WattAge E3D--can handily fly any maneuver the pilot is capable of.
Of course, in both glow and electric, we've reached a point where the airplanes are FAR better than most of the pilots who own them. But that's another story.
Moe
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Commercially available electric power systems in these videos: (warning huge files) check it out.
http://www.rccraze.com/hackervideos.html
check out "the artist" and the noon demos at the bottom.
all electric....nuff said!
wrote:

commercially
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You'll be the envy of your club. When I joined my club, I had never even owned a gas plane. Everyone told me that I would have to get gas if I wanted to be serious about flying. In their estimation, electrics were merely toys. A few of the guys had Zagi's, but that was it.
Well I bought an UltraStick 40 ARF and put a Jeti 45/3 in it with 18 3000 nimh batteries. The thing flew great in all whether. I eventually put a 2:1 gear box on it and could hover and perform any manuever that the gas guys could.
Suddenly, I was getting some respect at the club and everyone was asking questions about electric power. Now there are several members that have switched to electric.
I can only imagine what the plane would have flown like back then, if I had owned LiPoly cells at the time.
Go get yourself and UltraStick. Its a great first plane for learning more advanced flight and will fly perfect with electric power.
-- dtanderson
If it ain't broke, I probably didn't fly it. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Posted from the RCGroups.com Discussion Forums. Visit us at http://www.rcgroups.com <------- Win free R/C Gear! View this thread at rcgroups.com: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?threadid 9808
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