Which Electric Trainer

I'm looking to get started in flying.
I don't want to start off with gas.
What would you recommend under say, $250.00 US.
Reply to
newflyer
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robbe cardinal EP Speed 600 3 flyers on our field have them and they are very "gleuable" whit a speed600 race and 2400nicad 15m of flight is easy (19min his personal rec)
TM
Reply to
dingo
Without a doubt the Multiplex Easy Star. I've flown it about 12-14 times so far and I'm a raw novice. Pay close attention to the center of gravity. I have crashed it numerous times and it just gets tossed up to fly again. Great and very durable trainer. I got the RTF version at:
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When you can keep it flying for an entire battery pack you might want to buy two extra packs from here:
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Scroll down to the pack.
Battery Pack: PC11X7F 7 Cell 1100 mAh Folded NiMH w/Connector ..... $ 29.90
I now have the stock pack and two of the NiMH packs. I fly at about 70% throttle as I find it easier to control and get 10 minutes of flying "up high" then I bring it down to tree top level for another 3-5 minutes; this on the NiMH packs. The stock pack gives about 7 min and then 3 more low flying.
There is a lot of info on this BB just on the EasyStar. The first page (of 13) is here:
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Good Luck,
Tony
Reply to
Tony S
EasyStar Links:
North Star RC (also check Ebay)
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Cheap Battery Packs (A7KAN1050BR pack with "Tamiya Large Female" plug fits EasyStar RTF)
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Flying Model Simulator
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Zip File
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On the RTF version, ensure the control surfaces move in the proper direction (they are switchable on the transmitter), and that the lettering on the white Gunther propeller faces the tail.
Reply to
aeropal
where do you want to fly ?? indoor or outdoor. If you want to reuse all battery stuff from your first plane to your second. then you better look for a speed 400 trainerplane.
I made the mistake of building a speed 600 plane as my first. So i was able to use my 6cell packs from my car. When i started looking for a second plane the choises of speed600 planes are very limited (GP ryan EP or multiplex skycat.)
if you stay in the speed 400 class you can reuse most of materials especially battery's.
Reply to
dingo
A T-52 from
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it's big, handles wind and is tough. I
takes a speed 400/480 with a gearbox. Can be built with ailerons
-- Solca ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Solcat's Profile:
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this thread:
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Reply to
Solcat
Not True! It can be flown indoors, but is an outdoor plane. You may be thinking of the Pico Stick.
It won't bounce as well as the EPP foam planes, but it's easy to repair, and cheap enough to replace in case of major catastrophe.... And it flies very well to boot.
PCPhill
Reply to
PCPhill
Slowstick is 350 trainer plane.Mosty stuff ports up to 400.
This is fairly true. 300-480 sized are the cheapest reaosonable outdoor planes.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
That's a hard one. Does that budget cover plane only, or plane plus radio?
First of all, and I'm not biazed here, I'm an electric-only person, consider your reasons for wanting to go electric. Most electric planes are actually HARDER to control than their glow (semi-diesel) counterparts. This is because of their weight. Electrics are usually smaller/lighter, and for a beginner, size + weight "is your friend". A good trainer plane is one that's large enough to be visible, and heavy enough to withstand some wind without serious pilot corrections. Electric planes also tend to be more expensive (in the beginning) than their fuel counterparts (but end up cheaper in the long run).
ok. Back to your question, a good electric trainer.
I would recommend the Kyosho "Spree ES", although this is a relatively small plane. It comes in two variants, the "Readyset", and the "ARF". The first includes all radio gear, the last does not.
This plane is a high-winger, with rudder+elevator+throttle control. Even if this plane is build from balsa+plastic film, it's amazingly robust, and due to it's balsa rib-cage, relatively repairable.
When you can control it, move onto the Spree Sports to get ailerons.
Just remember that almost every person who has learnt to fly a model aircraft has started spending 90% of their time repairing. Don't loose confidence if you crash, we've all done that. When you get better, you can crash with the best of us :p
//Svein
Reply to
Svein Skogen
Ehm...
Brushed electric motors are basically: Brushed electric motors. Car/Boat/Heli/FixedWing/Whatever.
Unless your batteries are lead/acid, they can be used in an aeroplane aswell.
Btw: My "400-sized" electric plane digests 120/30 (Peak/Average) Amperes at 7 cells NiCd. Carrying it's 355grammes pack, it's quite aerobatic. At 996 mm span.
//Svein
Reply to
Svein Skogen

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