Anglo-american standards

Where I could buy or download anglo-american standards relating to technical
drawing?
Especially I am interested is there any standard that unifies styles of
drawing; for example: If one company use white color for main lines and
other red color that takes a lot of time to accomodate drawings according
to company's standard.
I know that in Croatia and Europe there are not such standards but maybe
there are in USA or Australia??
Thanks...
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Reply to
Sinisa Knezevic
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Welcome to the snake pit -
Check out
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for a List of BS ISO Standards for Technical and Construction Drawings.
Not that many perople work to them!
Cadalot
Reply to
Cadalot
Closest thing to an American standard is ASME/ANSI Y14.5, but it's really not a drafting standard and won't give you such things as standard layers/colors, fonts or "style". It's a dimensioning standard and closely parallels ISO standards.
Mark 'Sporky' Stapleton Watermark Design, LLC
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Reply to
Sporkman
Btw, is it much different than ISO standards? Soon I have to make some drawings for american company that will instal its equipment in Australia, so this information could be very useful..
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Reply to
Sinisa Knezevic
If you know, what about Australia, are their standards 'compatible' with BS?
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Reply to
Sinisa Knezevic
Not greatly different, no. The biggest difference is the use of 3rd angle projection (in American ASME/ANSI standards) as opposed to 1st angle projection (in European ISO standards).
'Sporky'
Reply to
Sporkman
For an Introduction to First and Third Angle Projection see link below
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Regards
Alan (Cadalot)
Reply to
Cadalot
ISO might refer to 1st angle, but I think most U.K. companies use 3rd angle as a matter of course. It is the more logical of the two choices, I feel. I get somewhat frustrated looking at German motor/gearbox catalogues that show motor and box combinations and mounting arrangement in 1st angle. Head-scratching becomes the order of the day!
Reply to
B. W. Salt.
Absolutely right 3rd angle is what is used. irrespective of what ISO (or current BS) says. I explain it to young trainees like this :- You've just drawn the side elevation of a steam locomotive (choose a long one like a BR 9F) Now, which end do you want to draw the end elevation showing the inside of the cab at? They soon see the logic of 3rd angle projection.
And by the way, what is the decimal seperator? Yes, its a " . " NOT a " , " whatever the standard says! "BS 4 FAT LADIES" , sorry BS8888 has lost its way.
Reply to
designer
I blame the EU myself. Must do what they do on the other side of the channel :-(
Reply to
B. W. Salt.
Don't be defeatist. I think the problem lies with insufficient backing being given by British industry to BS so they have the backbone to kick some of this 'imported' stuff into touch.
Reply to
designer
Me? Defeatist? You have to be joking. We went metric in 1972 (the company I worked for, that is!). Once had to do a job for a local ship repair company that still worked in fractions of an inch, to 1/128". Blew my head away (as one might say). It was always 3rd angle - American company... ...and they went metric. Good for them.
Reply to
B. W. Salt.
ROFLMFAO......... Wow, you've really complicated something so very very simple!!
Reply to
Mike the Kiwi
Hehe. Yeah.....and I still don't get it!
Reply to
Michael Bulatovich
I think I must just have beaten you to metrication. Metrication together with electronic calculators must have been the greatest productivity gain in the drawing office. Was able to consign Inskips Combined Tables to propping up the desk!
Reply to
designer
The Australian standard is a direct reproduction of the ISO standard. (even the number is the same)
That said, I know of no Australian firm that actually uses it. But then I dont do mechanical work so.....
Dean Australia
Reply to
Dean
OK Mike, what ROFLOMFAO mean ?
And thats the way they use to teach it back in the mid - 70's ;0) It's only simple if you have a 3D mind, there are people out there that don't and need to be shown step by step.
Alan
Reply to
Cadalot
OMG, Wooly. See link:
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TIA
Reply to
Michael Bulatovich
The easiest to visualize method I have seen is to imagine putting the part in a bowl. Slide it to the right. See which way it rotates. Slide it forward. See which way it rotates. The difference between first and third angle projection is simply which way the bowl is sitting. Right side up or upside down.
Reply to
CW

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