Anvil touch-up

Ecnerwal wrote:


Just how deep are the dings? Have you considered taking the anvil to a machine shop and having the face decked flat? Carbides will go through even hardface like a hot knife through butter. This is a cold operation with loads of coolant applied to the tool, and shouldn't take more than ten or fifteen minutes on the machine. Auto machine shops deck cylinder heads and blocks every day, so an anvil shouldn't pose an 'overload the machine' situation.
Charly
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Charly the Bastard wrote:

I agree with Mr Bastard, a machine shop can do wonders for an anvil, if however the indents are too great then you might have to attach a new face.
I was looking into a cheap way of doing this, by forging a custom saddle out of 10 mm spring steel, heat treating it, and screwing it on (you could weld it on, but it's easier to make a new saddle later if the need arises).
Only do this if there are no other option.
Regards Charles
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On Thu, 21 Sep 2006 01:14:25 GMT, Ecnerwal

An anvil should be cast iron. - Regards Gordie
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The Nolalu Barn Owl wrote:

The face should be better than that, so not all of it should be cast iron.
Regards Charles
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Chilla wrote:

NONE of it should be cast iron if it is to be worth having around!
WROUGHT iron! It should be wrought iron. Wrought is a way different animal from cast iron.
Cast iron anvils are dead under the hammer, cast steel, not.
The typical construction of an anvil like a Peter Wright was for the base and horn to be forge welded together with a higher carbon steel plate on the top.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Trevor Jones wrote:

Hi Trevor,
As long as the face is good the rest just needs to have weight, sure a wrought iron body & horn would be great... if you can get the wrought iron in the first place. So cast iron would work, but it wouldn't be the best anvil around.
I was discussing the virtues of anvils with a couple of engineering and fabrication teachers recently, and asked the "casters" question.
"Could I cast an anvil out of bronze, but have a face made from spring steel?"
The answer was "Yes that would work really well".
An anvil can even be made from granite (although personally I wouldn't use one made from rock).
Again cat skinning can be done many ways ;-)
Regards Charles P.S. I have a few chunks of wrought iron... just got to decide what to do with them :-)
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Chilla wrote:

Just replying to the assertion that the anvil should be made of cast iron, is all. PW did not go to the trouble of pointing out that their goods were of "Solid Wrought" construction without having an inkling that there was a difference.
Bronze and spring steel, eh? I wonder if there would be problens with separation of the plate on the face with work.
I have heard from a few guys that the Vulcan cast anvils were sometimes reasonable to work on, and I suspect that they may have been a bit closer to the steel side of the mix, coming out of their cupola, making for a bit better action, though my supposition is grounded only in supposition. :-)
I know that there are re-creators that do Viking era smithing on rocks chosen for their anvilness. And I did see a 12 by 18 by 24 inches granite surface plate go through a surplus website a while back.... :-)
It pains me, most days, to have to walk past a 275 or so pound Peddinghaus (spelling?) at work. Pristine. Unused. Never gonna be either.... <sigh> :-( Taking up space, and occasionally used to prop open a door.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Hi Trevor,
That's cool, I like to go into details a bit.
We were discussing how to attach the bronze body to the steel face, and figured that a key forged into the steel plate could lock into the bronze body. I suggested heavy screws (again like a semi permanent saddle).
I'm waiting for an auction, before I attempt this, 'cause if I buy a good anvil I wont have to make one ;-)
Not sure about Vulcan anvils, I'm sure there's some info on the net somewhere.
Wayne Goddard uses a granite surface on occasion, although I think it's only for light forging jobs. You'd definitely want to wear eye protection (well you should anyway) with rock chips flying off.
What??? Make an offer... it's a shame for that anvil to go to waste.
Regards Charles
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Chilla wrote:

I've got a 150# Vulcan, love it. It's on exended loan from a bud, so when I retire completely I'll have to give it back. It rang fairly loudly at first, but a piece of sheet lead under the base cured that, much to the delight of the neighbors. The hardface extends out onto the horn and around the nose, appears to be cast in place at fabrication, about a half inch thick on the face. Sure beats the crap out of the railroad rail I was using.
Charly
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Trevor Jones wrote:

I've done a fair amount of work on a friend's 300 pound Vulcan. It is dead, but it seems to work just fine compared to my 246 pound PW.
Steve
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I surface grind anvils for people who have already repaired them or when someone wants a face touched up.
Here are comments from my webpage on the subject (excuse the html code). Particularly note the comments about the edges. Also, you can do a pretty good job of truing up a repaired face with a 7 or 9 inch angle grinder and a carpenter's square.
from www.spaco.org/anvlgrnd.htm ----:
Several people have asked me questions about the Face Grinding of anvils that I do on my old 8 X20 surface grinder. Here are some of the answers:<br> Yes, I do some anvil resurfacing. But I only do surface grinding of the anvil face. If that's all that is needed, I can do it. I charge $2.00 per thousandth of an inch removed. That gets me about $20 per hour for me and the surface grinder and includes setup and base truing, if necessary. I haven't ever worked on an anvil that took less than 30 thousandths to true up. I have worked on anvils up to about 150# and I think I could handle one up to about 190#.<br><br>
In sizing up your anvil, lay a straight edge across it several different ways and, using a scale (machinists rule) that measures 64ths of an inch, estimate the amount of "sway" in the anvil and the depth of the worst nick or dent. One 64th of an inch is 16 thousandths or $32. Don't worry tooooooo much about nicks on the edges of the anvil as long as there are a few inches that will probably clean up to "square". I say this because most of us don't have ENOUGH radius on the edges of our anvil as it is. You need a radius of as much as a dime at the edges of the face closest to the horn and it should taper to nothing (square) 4 or 5 inches back from there. ---Both on the near and far sides of the face. That is, unless you are a farrier; they like sharp square edges.<br><br>
Sometimes an anvil's owner tells me about how much removal they want to pay for and sometimes they just say "clean it up". I would prefer that the owner be there when I grind it so they can decide when I should stop if the anvil isn't cleaning up completely. This makes sense because sometimes there will be only one spot that has a deep gouge and it's really not worth it the grind away at the whole anvil for just one spot.<br> I can take the anvil down a agreed upon amount, (or less if it cleans up), stop grinding, then call the owner and report the condition.<br> The owner can then decide to stop or to take off more----As long as I don't have to wait several days to contact the owner.<br><br>
If the anvil needs to be welded on to replace missing metal, I don't know who is doing it right now. In the Twin Cities area, Myron Hanson has done several recently, Dick Carlson has done at least one as has Bob Beck. But it is a dirty, lengthy job and Myron tells me that he doesn't want to do it anymore. You can certainly ask around.<br> In order to save yourself a lot of time, if the anvil is repaired by welding, take the time to true up the face to the best of your ability before you send it to me. It takes just about as long to make one full pass of 0.002 inches to catch a small bump as it does to work the whole face!!!<br> I hope this discussion solves more problems than it raises. Please let me know if you need more information or if I have just confused you. I have been doing this anvil face grinding on and off for over 3 years now and this is the first time I have written this stuff down for anyone.<br><br>
Pete Stanaitis ----------------------
Ecnerwal wrote:

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