DH-2 Specs?



All those things are possible with stock removal... Not necessarily the best way to go about it but, I *could* do it and I'm hardly an expert.

Hmm, honestly don't remember any specifics from the movie but if you cruize the commercial blade seller sites you can find it under fantasy/movie swords

Yeah, I think so. Still, he works in 5160 mostly and does really cool work and manages all the curvy stuff quite well. Check out http://jodysamson.com if you've never been there. Neat work. Big on lost wax cast bronze fittings. Got me interested in trying some casting. Something else to play around with since I've got the capability to melt down lower temperature metals now. I've been successful melting brass brazing rod (muntz metal) into a ceramic form. I figure its a good way to get oddball shapes from readily available brass stock. Later on I want to do pattern welded and Mokume Gane fittings but for now brass will suit.
GA
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There's something else I've been curious about; how were files and rasps made before modern equipment? I'm guessing it was a long slow process with a chisel and a lot of patience, but maybe there's a trick I'm missing.
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"Joe Bramblett, KD5NRH" wrote:

You're right about the chisels -- or chisel-like implements -- but the process is surprisingly fast. Filemaking was a specialized trade and the filemaker used a leather strap and a foot pedal to hold the file to the bench. With the hammer in one hand and the tool in the other, an experienced file maker could cut the teeth in a medium grade single-cut file in a few minutes. Things like punches were used to raise the teeth on rasps.
--RC
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Some of the last tools it's still done on are stone-cutting rifflers for sculpture in marble and such. The hand-made Italian ones are really cool-
Chas
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Chas wrote:

You can still get hand-cut rifflers and rasps for wood carving as well. The random pattern of the teeth makes them especially effective. However I don't know of anyone making hand-cut files any more.
--RC
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Whoa! :) I've recently discovered hand hacksaw blades with variable pitch teeth. :) They work so-good it's a wonder why they weren't made that way all along. :/
MSC sells 'em, got some fine toothed ones from them and coarse toothed ones from town (Kent's Tools). I've been using the coarse ones (which are extra coarse) for those small wood handle slabs.
Was using a new miter saw that I'd modified the handle on so the handle was down even with the teeth for less chatter... don't use it anymore! :)
Try 'em you'll like 'em. :)
Man, there is no stinkin way I'd buy a new carpenter's saw without varible pitch teeth! :/
Alvin in AZ
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On Fri, 8 Oct 2004 08:19:35 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@XX.com wrote:

I few years ago I made up hand hacksaw blade up for a gag gift for a buddy of mine, I made it out of a 12 inch section of a 1 1/2 inch X .062 4 - 5 tooth bandsaw blade that snapped right beside the weld as soon as I hit the hydraulics to tension the band, (same band as what I made fillet knife blades from) . Then I set it up in one of all steel, balck oxided China import hacksaw frame , the ones that look like they could have been made a century ago or yesterday,,
When Mark opened it up he got a good chuckle then went over to the scrap bin and pulled out a short length of 2 X 2 mild steel square stock and put it in the vice, and proceeded to cut it in half about as fast as he does with the Sawzall,, I only made it as a joke, I never intended for it to be actually used for anything,,, but it was a brand new blade when it broke so the teeth were good and sharp,,, I know I wouldn't want to have to run a handsaw like that myself,, but every now and again some young pup will think he's tough so he'll get invited to "Help us out and cut about four 3 inch long pieces of that 2 X 2 square stock, we need a few spacers here." the hacksaw is on the rack qabove the vice.
It's still hanging on the rack in his shop, I saw it there when I was out to his place last night.
Bear
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Cool story. :) I've thought about doing that with a smaller bandsaw blade but put it in one of the cowboy's big ol' meat saw frames as a test.
Hmmm... need to ask around the machine shop in the community college for a couple foot long piece of varible tooth, bi-metal, bandsaw blade. ;)
Alvin in AZ
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Good one Bear -
I have a broken blade like that - almost new. What I plan on is making or just buying one - an H saw - the bottom of the H is the blade, and the top of the H is the turnbuckle. The center is the pivot.
Typically used for cutting off the ends of limbs and such like that. I want to put a steel cutting blade - fine is ok - for use on very hard woods. The ones that wood saws jump across the cut area.
It would be handy in cutting wide or bulky things that can't fit in a jaw of a saw. Or simply out in the 'field' away from the saw.
The H allows higher tension than a hacksaw and naturally longer cut.
Martin
bear wrote:

--
Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
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On Sat, 09 Oct 2004 03:24:46 GMT, "Martin H. Eastburn"

You are right, the finer toothed blade like a 12 - 14 pitch or finer work pretty good on hard woods, the 4 - 5 pitch blade wants to bury the teeth even in dry oak,, it works OK on aluminum or harder only.
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Ya, they used chisels. I imagine that in skilled hands it could be fairly quick and accurate.
to see an early machine look at;
http://metalworking.com/dropbox/a-m_file_cutter.JPG
http://metalworking.com/dropbox/a-m_file_cutter2.JPG
Paul K. Dickman
Joe Bramblett, KD5NRH wrote in message ...

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Now that is one beatiful machine. From the scrollwork I'd say much, if not most, of it was hand-forged. What a job that must have been! The original owner must have put out a lot of cash for something like that. I wonder if it was that pretty and shiny during its working life.... bet not. Thanks for the pics, Paul.
I want one! :-)
-- Bill H. [my "reply to" address is real] www.necka.net Molon Labe!
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On 06 Oct 2004 19:59:58 GMT, "Joe Bramblett, KD5NRH"

It's described in Bealer's book, one of the bits that book is quite good for.
Most farrier blacksmiths could make their own rasps, but filemaking was a specialist trade. They had their own style of hammer and everything.
--
Smert' spamionam

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"Joe Bramblett, KD5NRH" wrote:

In Ye Olden Dayes, that was the case. Then Leonardo Da Vinci designed a file making machine that would automaticly move the file blank with every incision of the forming tool, and modern versions are a parametric variant of the original design.
Charly you learn the wierdset stuff on PBS
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Chas wrote:

Actually, fullers came first. Fullering was used to widen the billet, to make the iron go farther. Fullering was originally a forging operation which pushed the iron to the edges of the billet before forming the bevel. Around the 11th century, improvments in blast furnace design allowed smelters to actually melt the iron out of the rock, instead of blooming the ore then pounding the gelatinous slag out with hammers to consolidate the iron filaments into a billet. The resultant increase in supply allowed smiths to go to the diamond cross section, which took less time to fabricate. Time is money. You get what you pay for. I fuller with either a dieset for the LG or with a mill, depending on how much the customer is willing to fork over. Both methods increase the overall strength due to shape. A fuller turns the center of the sword into an I-beam, oriented against the bending force applied in use.
Charly
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Charly the Bastard wrote: >

Both methods increase the overall strength to weight ratio.....
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Jamie Hart wrote:

Yeah, but milling actually removes mass, fullering just pushes it around. Start with two billets the same dimension, make swords. The milled one will weigh less than the forge fullered and beveled one. Not by much, but measurable. And... since 5160 is a deep hardening alloy, all that 'grain refinement' that you supposedly got from all that sweaty hammering disappears in the tank. The grain in hot roll looks like a flattened tree in cross section from the supplier, lots of concentric ovals. After it goes through the dies, it still looks like concentric ovals, just squeezed a bit in the center and at the edges. For all the energy and effort, it's just not that big an advantage in the finished piece. I took ten blades, five milled and five forged, and took them to the testing lab and put them against the Big Press. There was less than 1000 pounds difference from the weakest to the strongest in a shear failure mode. Considering the average was about 38 tons, why bother sweating?
Charly
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into an

Start
weigh less

And... since

supposedly got

roll looks

concentric ovals.

squeezed
just not

milled and

Press.
strongest in a

sweating?
Now hang on a minute here. Mass can be planned in the inital stages. Just start with less steel. As for sweaty work, I happen to like hammering hot metal in the back yard as the sun drops over the horizon and hanging out by the forge is kind of like kickin' it around the camp fire. Poetic, ya know? Besides, in the summer time I loose more sweat in the shop than I ever do pounding steel in the back yard. And, a well forged blade makes the shop work a lot easier (Not that I claim to forge well ;-) )
GA
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Greyangel wrote:

As a hobby, yeah, I like pounding hot iron too. But when you try to pay the bill$ with it, you look for the fastest, easiest way to turn stock into parts. Mill blades take a lot less time and energy than forged ones, and the price of energy is a growing factor. That gas meter sure spins fast when I wake Elliot up, and Mr Sparky charges more for each dance we do. I've been pushing the top end on price for years now, I don't think the market will go much higher. So, with the vend price topped out and energy costs climbing, I have to try to speed production up without sacrificing quality to keep the profit margin stable, or I go hungry. Cold equations, totally merciless.
Charly
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I work in that environment day in and day out. It has a way of sucking your soul dry. I come home and do the blade work to take myself off to a place that has no place in our net profit world. I want to do "Art" and maybe some day I will be good enough to call it that. In the mean time I just enjoy doing work that I don't have to finish on a time schedule and can do how and when I want ('cept when I gotta be at the job...). I can't imaging actually getting my wages from knife making. If I'm lucky and diligent, I figure it may supplement my income when I retire.
GA

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Elliot
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