DH-2 Specs?



We sll support your lifestyle choices, but you've got to stop beating yourself up over these things. Have you even told Art how you feel?
Sorry, couldn't resist :)
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Haha, Ill run that one by my wife ;)
GA
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Charly the Bastard wrote:

Fullers go back even further than that. Bronze swords had them for strengthening. (See Oakeshott)
--RC
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Last time I talked to Howard Clark he just got a large order of L6 in 20 foot, 3/4" round rods. (it's the cheapest way to get it?)

Sounds right to me. :)
Talking about cheesy blades... Just saw The Alamo with Billy Bob;) and Jason Patric as Jim Bowie the knife and actor was cheesy as anything! :)
Foley people made it sound like a big piece of plain sheet metal which would plain ol' grate on my nerves everytime it was taken out. :{
Jason Patric's "The Beast" is a cool movie tho. :)
Alvin in AZ
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Nice! Where did he purchase it? And yes, if Admiral's prices on the 52100 is an indicator, then we're talking around 25% of the flat stock prices. I ain't skeered 'o no 3/4 round. Its that 1 inch square stuff that beat me up ;-)

Ya wouldna wanta be trustin' ol Slingblade with a real knife now wouldya? uhhuh.

Never heard of it. Should I?
GA
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snipped-for-privacy@XX.com Spaketh Thusly:

Ayup. I've been on it for a while, learned quite a bit. Russ Kepler runs it off his server.
-- Bill H. [my "reply to" address is real] www.necka.net Molon Labe!
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snipped-for-privacy@XX.com wrote:

Well, part of a sword's strength comes from the shape (cross section). The most common failure other than bad heat treatment is shear failure at the shoulder, where the cross section changes dramaticly. You see this a LOT in imports and wallhangers, designed in for insurance purposes. My 5160 swords test out at 38 tons before shear failure at Rc53-55, which is more than any human can muster in 'normal' use. The only thing I won't warranty is laying the sword on a train track and waiting for the Pacific Flyer to come by at 60 mph or so. I have had swords run over repeatedly by tanks and SP artillary vehicles with no effect other than cosmetic scratching of the mild steel hardware. Fancy alloys are no substitute for good design. Considering that real mideval swords test out at 1040 to 1060, any modern high strength alloy will make a superior product to 'the real thing'. I use 5160 because it's cheap, available locally, easy to work, easy to heat treat, will take and hold a razor edge and a mirror finish. I have yet to have one come back for anything other than routine maintenance. My customers have used them for machettes, crowbars, building demolition, car scrapping, brush clearing, firewood chopping, bread slicing, butchering, and defense. The worst notch I 've seen came from a 3/4" grade 8 bolt, max depth .053". The bolt failed. YMMV.
Charly
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Charly the Bastard wrote:

The other thing that produces the transverse failure at the tang is that a lot of smiths don't bother to radius the shoulder. That leaves a stress point and you either have to compensate by making the tang thicker and broader, or you'll have a failure there.
As you say, fancy hardware is no substitute for good design.
--RC
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ROTF - Now that's what I call an all purpose tool! Problem is, folks get really cagey when you show up at work with a sword...
GA
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Greyangel wrote:

Well, that depends on where you work, now doesn't it. Some of the places I've 'worked' you were naked without one, and that four pound razor blade can give you a certain feeling of confidence in 'social situations'. The cops are afraid of my swords, because they know that their vests are just another quilted waistcoat up against them. Not that I'd carve up a cop, mind you, but it's nice to be on an even playing field up close. Respected equal, that's the ticket.
Charly
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get
I've
give
but
that's the

Problem with that is you are NEVER on an even playing field with cops, only individuals. I'm mildly curious about what kind of work it would come in handy with. I figure swords as a last ditch defense, as is a gun. Very rarely occasionally necessary and if at all possible, don't get caught. They do have the advantage of scaring off poorly armed rowdies. Again, don't get caught.
GA
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Greyangel wrote:

Try vending at a gathering of about 5000 rowdy drunks armed with wallhangers, commonly known as an SCA War. Incidents, while not common, have been known to happen. "Mine's bigger' is an effective intimidator, the pistol is the Last Resort, and has yet to be 'displayed'. You never know what a drunk is going to do, alcohol tends to cut off the circulation to the brain.
Charly
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folks
places
can
are
another
you,
only
in
wallhangers,
known to

Last
going to

Now there is a situation I can imagine ;-) Having the better sword would have a more inspiring affect there - Not to mention knowing how to use it. Snapping a wall hanger in half sounds like a lot of fun.
GA
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