Fast way to stop anvil from ringing

Related to the recent thread on mounting an anvil:
One quick way to stop an anvil from ringing is to put something in the
pritchel hole. An L shaped piece of round stock works well. If the short leg of the L is only an inch long it is pretty much out of the way. Consider personal safety when you decide on a shape. I often drop a holdfast into the hole when I am at someone else's anvil and the ringing annoys me.
Pete Stanaitis
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I've been told by those with a lot more experiance than me that a large magnet placed on the side of the anvil will reduce ringing. As will a chain around the base. Haven't had a chance to try either one yet. 73 Gary N9ZSV
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Neither chain nor magnet nor both did much to stop my PW from ringing. It apparently just _loves_ to sing. :)
Lead sheet is the next step before I lose the rest of my hearing. :)
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John, have you tried really tying it down tight? Chains and screw tighteners was the way I heard it.
Steve
John Husvar wrote:

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Steve,
That's about the only thing i haven't tried because I need to be able to move it readily.
Right now I have it secured with fitted wooden blocks on the sides of the foot.
Maybe a couple of lag bolted steel straps would work -- or maybe run some lag bolt/machine screw combination studs into the stump and tying it down with nuts on the machine screw side.
Hmmm. Good thread. Making me actually think! :)
But that thing sure do like to sing! Preacher offered it a spot in the church choir the other day! I loaned him a pair of ear plugs. :)
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John Husvar wrote:

I have a PW anvil that rings harsh and shrill. Sorta like a high pitched yappy dog going off next to your ear.
In comparison to most of the anvils I have seen, mine seems to be undertall and overlong. The long overhangs on each end seem to allow better vibration to take place.
I have about a pound of various magnets on it, but it still barks a bit. Mostly when working over the horn.
Just something to think about, if you get a chance to pick between anvils, go for the one with the stubby ends over the long ones.
If you get to be picky, anyway.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Got it in one! Yappy dog: Good Analogy!

Same here -- long horn and tail.
<church_lady> Is it? Could it be? Saaaaatan? </church_lady>

That's pretty much how mine acts too. Glad it's not just me.

I think I'll keep that in mind. My 200+-year-old Mousehole didn't make near the noise and was still tough as could be except where the face had loosened. It still had a good-sized sweet spot left. A friend in CT has it now.

Picky ain't in the budget this year. (and maybe next and the year after....n) :)
Thanks for your advice, though. I'll try some of the tricks mentioned here.
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Saw some pictures on the net of a guy who filled a (read wife's cake pan) small tray with sand about 1" deep and set the anvil in it. He then added about another inch of material on top of it. He swore by it to stop anvil singing. As I don't hammer enough to make it an issue so I don't worry about it.
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John Husvar wrote:

My PW sings too. I RTV'd it to the stump. Sounds more like lead now.
The magnet idea scares me a little. I left a speaker magnet on my big-ole machinist's vise (125#) for too long and now the damn thing is magnetic. Filings stick to it. No fun. I'd hate to end up with a magnetic anvil. The black firescale will stick to a magnet.
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Carl wrote:

machinist's vise (125#) for too long and now the damn thing is magnetic. Filings stick to it. No fun. I'd hate to end up with a magnetic anvil. The black firescale will stick to a magnet.
Got a buzz box AC welder? Wrap the leads around the magnetized item, and go hard on a chunk of scrap with some heavy rod. The AC current in the coil will demag the item in the coil. Ideally, form a coil and have someone else hold the coil over the item and draw it away while the current is flowing.
Best if they leave their watch and wallet on the far side of the shop for this.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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spaco wrote:

Go to a roofing supply and get some sheet lead, it's used for flashing on older buildings. Put a couple layers under the anvil. That should damp the vibration as it exits the base of the anvil and reduce the reflected energy.
Charly
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I took 2 pieces of angle iron - long enough to span both feet on each side - drilled a hole in one leg (of the angle) and lagged them into the stump. One handy byproduct is that when the angle sits flat against the feet it acts like a trough (in the shape of a vee) where hardies and such can sit. It stopped the ring very well while keeping the anvil from dancing.
Eide

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Take an old speaker magnet, slap it on the side of your anvil and voila the ringing is quieted. i use two large ones and there also handy for holding small tools while your working Paddy P the wannabe
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I tried that, didn't seem to work as well as securing it down.

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Here's a higher tech way to do the sound damping. I haven't tried it, but it the usual engineering way to damp resonant vibrations like this one. There is a distributer search on 3m's web site, but I didn't find an online supplier. Might be something to try if you really want to damp an anvil.
3M Constrained Layer Damper SJ-2053 Additional Information Helps damp vibrations on panels and steel support members vibrating at their natural (resonant) frequency. This dampers consists of a pressure-sensitive viscoelastic polymer and aluminum foil constraining layer. The damper effectively converts vibrational energy to negligible heat to reduce irritating noises and decrease wear and tear on parts. Controls resonant vibrations from minus 50 degrees Fahrenheit to 100 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 45 degrees Celsius to 35 degrees Celsius).
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spaco wrote:

Magnets can be partially effective, 'til you need to use the space they're occupying, which is usually when you're too busy to move the magnet.
The most effective method I've found of stopping anvil ring is the old farrier trick of securely attaching (bolting) a relatively light anvil to a heavy, portable, base. If there's lead sheeting between anvil and base, it's even quieter. None of the Peter Wright London pattern anvils at the shop weigh more than 179#, each is bolted to a base of 1" plate welded to 1 1/2" sch 40 pipe legs in the shape of a tripod, each goes "thunk" when struck, instead of the characteristic diiiiiinnnnnggggg of a PW.
If anyone's interested, I can post pictures.
--
Tom Stovall, CJF
Farrier-Artist-Blacksmith
  Click to see the full signature.
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