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It has occured to me that just making stuff like pattern welded steel and Mokume stock has more dollar per hour value than making knives. I'm guessing it would feel more like plain work after a short time though. Not something you'd want to do for a business without a big machine hammer either. It'd be worth your time to make extra if you were gonna do it though, even if retail is not your intent.
GA
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On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 15:49:20 +0000, alvinj wrote:

Could you explain? It sounds like a water bottling factory which uses activated charcoal. If this is so, I'd want to know if the used charcoal has a higher than usual content of heavy metals and other nasties which were removed from the water.
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A water bottling outfit will have a carbon filter, before the water softener, before the reverse osmosis unit, all to protect the "RO membrane". :)
Ask them if they've added anything to the charcoal. :) They will know. They sometimes do too. Cu and Zn are the two they add around here sometimes. Cu is bad if very much of it ends up in the steel.
Forging wouldn't matter I guess, since they claim boron from the borax doesn't get in the steel enough to matter. Or so it's said.
Whatever is in the water that gets caught by the filter should be ok unless the carbon ends up with Cu in it from copper water lines. Don't know nothin' about that yet. The carbon filter grabs on to the chlorine real well is the only one I'm sure of.
The plan is to make some iron and get it tested right away to find out if my iron-sand-source is high in Mn or other stuff (P, S, Cu) that would interfere with a high quality, high carbon steel.
A water-softener is nothing more than a filter, but is a reactive filter in that its media "zeolite" actracts Ca and Mg carbonates. It don't hold much before it's full tho. ;) So a "brine wash" cleans it out good as new, after every so many gallons of water used.
Alvin in AZ
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I belong to two clubs that sell it to members. The Badger Blacksmiths in west central Wisconsin has coal in Glenwood City. The Guild of Metalsmiths has coal in Ramsey, MN (northern suburb of Mpls). The coal is very good blacksmithing coal. The price is about $4.00 per 5 gallon pail. Sorry that I cant' find the exact price. The Guild of Metalsmiths buys a 26 ton load about once a year. The Badger club gets a ton or two at a time from the Guild.
Pete Stanaitis
granpaw wrote:

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SNIP
Thanks 'again' Pete, I was looking on google (our friend) and found where I asked you the very same question last year...I think senility sets in quietly for sure!...
As for charcoal use in the forge, I entend to build a charcoal making set up my self somewhere in the 50 gal. drum range, I much prefer the stuff for forging but as was said before, it does take a lot more charcoal than coal.. I am used to using anything that will burn really, as I don't forge weld much and I make no blades except for plain ones out of car spings etc. I have heard though that the use of charcoal in good blades is a no-no due to the carbon content in the charcoal...I can't say one way or the other. I do know that I am tired as all hell of buying propane for the 'Whisper Daddy' and getting so little work for so much gas...I would say a 100 pound cyl. would not last long trying to forge weld, three burners at 10 pounds PSI is a lot of gas!.. granpaw
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That's just silly, IMHO. The coke that you make from coal in order to forge with coal is also essentially pure carbon. Major difference is that charcoal (actual, not briquets, which are mostly coal dust) is less dense, and has no clinker type impurities.
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