oxy leak

I have a oxy cutting torch comweld (cutting only) which leaks a small amount of oxygen out of the cutting nozzle centre hole even when the torch is
turned off . I have taken it to the local welding supplies repair shop but they refuse to even look at it because it is too old . Could some one help me with this problem . Maurie Knightly .
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amount
help
Buy a new Victor
Eddie
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If it is a really nice old torch, here is what I would suggest. Find a high quality brash polish, simulchrome, or something like it. Apply it generously to all of the external surfaces of the torch and rub vigorously. When the torch begins to aquire a brilliant , eye pleasing lustre, wipe clean all of the polish and hang it on your study or office wall. ; ' )
Honestly, I have picked up a lot of old torches, some can be set right, some can't. I have a box of regulators and torches that I periodically give away as wall hangers or I have even made a couple of lamps out of, when they aren't serviceable any more. Your description of the problem sounds like more than one component is bad. There should be two valves that prevent O2 from leaking from the high pressure central orifice. The first is the O2 knob usually at the base of the torch. The second is the valve actuated by the lever. If you are getting a continuous leak, both are failing. The lever valve may simply be a bad o-ring that could be replaced, but the primary O2 valve below is not as simple. It is generally a truncated cone machined on the end of the valve stem that fits into a precisely machined and lapped cone shape in the valve body. Sometimes the whole valve assembly can be replaced, but on many torches it cannot. These valves if taken care of will last damn near forever, but are often destroyed by carelessness. They get overtightened, the major cause of damage, or people don't blow out the lines before attaching the torch. If the lines aren't blown out there is a possibility of a bit of debris from the line lodging in the valve and messing the valve faces up. Given how the valves are constucted, it doesn't take much. The two failures often combine. A small bit of debris lodges in the torch valve, so it doesn't close properly, user determines that they just need to twist it a little tighter. Now a small bit of debris, through a lot of mechanical leverage is a groove in the valve face, and now the debris is embedded in the face, so blowing out the torch won't budge it anymore. These valves can be repaired and lapped in, but it takes a lot of skill, and most commonly available lapping compounds are a grease mixture, which is not something you want around your O2 valve. The reason your local shops won't touch it is because they know from experience that if that vale is bad, there is more wrong. Their labor will be costly and the probablility of a home welder simply not coming back for their $300 repair job is high, particularily if they put a hour or so into it and discover that the torch can't be set right. Modern working torches with good parts availablility can be had cheap at swap meets and pawn shops all over, thus my initial recomendation.
Charles
All at 58 wrote:

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