Carbide Pedestal / Bench Grinders

Baldor makes a 510 which they claim has a max of .002 run out and is for diamond wheels. Should this unit just be used for finishing?
Baldor makes a 500 which they say should be use for roughing carbide with "green" wheels.
Is anyone doing finish work on a Baldor 500 and using diamond wheels on it?
What about this deal?
http://www.accu-finish.com/seriestwo.html
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA
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jon_banquer wrote:

Jon, I have a Baldor 500 with diamond wheels on it. Mine has both a fine and a rough diamond wheels. I have used it to sharpen very small boring tools, .040 dia., and the like with good results.
Mine is very old, 20 years or more so unless they've changed model numbers I think the 500 would do a good job for you also.
Best, Steve
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What do you use when you need to rough out carbide? You just put a green wheel on your Baldor 500? You see no problem with using one grinder for roughing and finishing carbide?
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA
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jon_banquer wrote:

Jon, I don't do a lot of heavy roughing on it. What roughing I do the rough diamond wheel is adequate. Like I said, I do some small boring bars and haven't had a problem with run out or vibration which I would think would show up when doing the small boring bars. The finish is excellent.
Mine is 20 years old so the only caveat would be if Baldor has cheapened the model 500.
Best, Steve
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Diamond wheels on a stand ?
I used Diamond laps on horizontal water machines and water based verticle. Martin
jon_banquer wrote:

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Get a single lip cutter maker, a dekel preferably. Take the biggest diameter it can take and grind it in half. Now use it for the ledge to sharpen cutters etc.. with.
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cncmillgil wrote:

And be sure the cutting edge is red hot before dunking the carbide tool in the drink. The resulting micro thermal cracks will greatly enhance cutting performance and tool life.
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Black Dragon

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On Thu, 16 Jul 2009 12:48:58 +0000 (UTC), Black Dragon

Chipbreakers?
<G> -- Tom http://tinyurl.com/5okkgz
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What is the only cutting tool material can you grind till almost red (just when blue turns to red) & not hurt its cutting ability afterwords? hint: not carbide One of the old timers told me many moon ago, good ol HSS? M2 Any truth in that? I think so. (many melted drills later) Ah well, besides drills, who uses s HSS nowadays anyway? They do make nice center punches, beater pins ect. Sharping broken taps are the *best* punches.
And now here's something we hope you'll realy like........ Mr. Knowitall! Thank You Rockey.........
We now return you to the economic collapse, already in progress.
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cncmillgil wrote:

Stellite.
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John R. Carroll



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Yep
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Yep
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Is that powdered/cast metal? Heard of it, along with the other 'ite's, kurksite,meinite,waspoly-ite.:-) & my favor ite , unubtainium.
anyrate, what kind of things are made out of Stellite? Is it heat treat able?
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cncmillgil wrote:

People made cutting tools from it years ago but the best known use was automotive valves in cylinder heads.
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cncmillgil wrote:

Exhaust valves.
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More often used for valve seats. The old propane/butane LPG engines had stellite seats and stellite valves with sodium filled stems. Also used back then in "extreme duty" truck engines by all manufacturers. Some guys just couldn't understand why it cost $600 to rebuild a set of small block truck heads. The damn exhuast valves cost $50 each.
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And 90% bullshit.
The issue was tetraethyl lead was sold ( and lapped up) as a lubricant so that when the valve broke contact with the seat, a welding and tear of material didn't take place.
In cast iron heads, erosion did take place after hundreds of thousands of hours (adjustments to fuel mixtures sold stopped it all long before the material sales started)
The "valve" issue didn't/doesn't exist.
"High nickel" seats were and are sold by the billions to address the microsecond oxidation issue.
http://www.sbintl.com/valveseatinserts.html
http://www.martinwellsco.com/VaveSeats.html
Run em on propane with good old shitty valves.
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All I know is what I personally observed during the 35 + years I was involved in "re-manufacturing" engines of all types. Propane/butane engines used hard seats (stellite) and sodium filled stems because of the lack of lubricity of the fuel and too carry off the heat from the valve face faster.
I have seen many propane conversions that suffered valve seat recession of more than an eighth of an inch in less than 200 hours of operation because "it costs too much" to put hard seats and sodium valves in.
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Come on man.
The "sodium filled valves" and "stellite seats" aren't the issue.
You may have made your living doing it, but that doesn't make the BS true.
I did more than a couple motors myself, the oldest being built in 1914.
Sodium filled valves (go ahead and shoot us a link to a place to commonly purchase those for commonly made engines, shit how about a link for sodium filled valves for a small block Chevy) and "stellite" seats aren't the issue, never have been.
It is a very simple chemical reaction that has been around since the big bang.
How many new engines are built with sodium filled valves and stellite seats?
Fords?
GM?
Honda's?
Hyundai's?
Toyota's?
Harley Davidson's?
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any one ever tried cryogenics on carbide? Freeze the shit out of it for a week technique?
- that's way out there-
Be nice to have: before & after microscope pics excel spreadsheet with all data showing treated/ untreated - number of pcs ect. - placebo for JB.<g>
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