CNC Operator Certification

IMO it is hard to certify something such as CNC Operator, especially where the definition of operator varies from place to place. In one place it can be a warm body, in others it can be the ability to setup, edit a program and operate the machine.
To me an Operator is an entry level position, someone who knows or can be trained to operate the machine, perform operator checks, load, unload, check parts and input wear offsets. Where the person and their work ethic is more important than experience. When the person is able to operate and maintain the machinery with little or no supervision, do their own setups and hold close tolerances they are a setup person or setup/operator.
CNC Operator Proficiency Test
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(I just read the old post and there are some typo's that need to be corrected if someone plans to use it.)
Black Dragon covered this, if you can't answer the questions you're not qualified to evaluate an applicant. Some of the questions are designed to present opportunities for discussion with the applicant.
Tom
Reply to
brewertr
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Hmmmm...
Maybe what's needed, rather than certification, is a standardized vocabulary. If we all used the same definition of "operator", "programmer", "setup person", etc., then maybe people who actually have real skills, at any level, would be better able to find jobs without getting lost among all the pretenders and wannabees. And maybe companies looking for people could ask and advertise more accurately for what they need.
I'm not talking about laws or rules or ISO standards, or anything like that. Just a common usage. We all know the difference, for example, between manual machines, CNC, and automatic stuff, even though it would be hard to write exact definitions that don't have zillions of exceptions and contradictions. We use CNC machines in manual mode when dusting a fixture or boring chuck jaws, before we put the control in memory and let it run full automatic; but a CNC isn't a manual machine, and it's not at all the same as an automatic screw machine, or a Kingsbury, or whatever. But we know what the words mean, and we can use them effectively.
So certified definitions, or people, aren't necessary to have good words that we can all share, and which might help avoid confusion.
Anybody care to take a shot at some clear terms that we can all start using?
KG
Reply to
Kirk Gordon
--------- Now this looks like a good start that has the potental to produce some real progress.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
Oh! & J-Bonkers check question #28........
Reply to
brewertr
Certifications of "skills" to fill $12 - $16 hr (California rates)positions??? How about look at their resume and verify work reference? No experience?... train them. This is yet another dig for the wallet.
-- Bill
Reply to
Bill
The next one I hire will have the same certificate as the last one I hired.
4 year college degree in mechanical engineering.
JMHO
Jim
Reply to
jimz
Musta had a really low gpa.... Or was the college-version of jb.
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
Was a time that students wanted to stay in a city they lived in for many years getting one degree after another. One town I know of had some PHD's driving taxi's and enjoying life. I suspect the town and they grew up some more since then.
Martin
Proctologically Violated©® wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
I know quite a few people who have been CNC machining for longer than I have (20 years) who couldn't correctly answer one third of the questions on that test. These are top dollar skilled tradesman I'm talking about too, not part loaders / button pushers in production shops.
One guy who couldn't turn the spindle on on a machine with a Delta (Dynapath) control without first writing a program with Mastercam and uploading to the machine went on to be part owner of a mold shop.
The number of people that are totally dependent on CAD/CAM systems and know fuck all about CNC machines and controls themselves is so staggering it's downright scary. In my experience in mold shops, anyway. Is kind of depressing when I think about it and discouraging when I try to teach these things and the recipients don't give a flying fuck about it. :(
Reply to
Black Dragon
Mebbe I could become a consultant to these shops. :)
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
Not my experience and I would be shocked to see it first hand.
Agreed, a few times I have seen where a computer or network goes down and the whole shop pretty much comes to a screeching halt.
I don't waste my time on people who don't care, but it is rewarding (even fun) to teach those who do care and are eager to learn.
Tom
Reply to
brewertr
Something makes me think it was your delivery.......lets see
Up to this point you're good.........
This MIGHT be the point where he turned on ya......LOL.....
Tom
Reply to
brewertr
Ya' think?
Sheesh.
JC
Reply to
John R. Carroll
could be.........
Reply to
brewertr

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