cnc programming book for turning (student )

i m student and i want to learn cnc programming in turning (fanuc contrrol pannel) pl suggest me to reffer book for cnc turning

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http://home.columbus.rr.com/hputz /
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On 3 Aug 2006 01:36:21 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

=================================A great deal depends on what you intend to do with the knowledge. Is this intended as an academic exercise in an engineering program or to actually produce parts?
For real programming, that is to physically cut metal, attempting to learn CNC from a book is like attempting to learn to ride a motorcycle from a book, when you can't yet ride a bicycle.
In my experience it is critical to have enough "hands-on" experience with a manual lathe and milling machine so that you have "internalized" (which is a fancy way of saying you understand and apply without thinking [too much] about) concepts such as depth-of-cut, feeds/speeds, chatter, surface finish, measurement techniques/tools, and many more. This is not to say that you must be a master tool-and-die maker but rather you must understand the foundations of the craft. In general, a single semester of instruction in lathe or milling machine operation will not be sufficient unless you have spent *CONSIDERABLE* time on the machines making [many] mistakes, set-ups, and small utility projects. For lathe work I suggest that you should at least be able to (1) consistently cut an external Acme thread to a "good" fit in a nut, from oversize bar stock, and (2) consistently machine an external morse taper shank, starting with a stripped [no chuck, tooling or accessories such as a travel-rest] lathe.
CNC programming will consist of telling the lathe controller to automatically apply the same steps to the materials being machined, although these are generally much simpler on the CNC machine, for example taper machining.
To answer your specific question about a suggested text: see: (Amazon.com product link shortened)(3155 http://btobsearch.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?z=y&btob=Y&pwb=1&ean 80831131586
also see http://btobsearch.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?z=y&btob=Y&pwb=1&ean 80831131623 http://btobsearch.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?z=y&btob=Y&pwb=1&ean 80831131296
This one includes a simulator (Amazon.com product link shortened)(3155
Fanuc also has a number of publications which may be helpful, and there are a number of computer simulation programs from the overly simple to the highly realistic that can be helpful, however in many cases are more helpful in checking the program machine syntax than catching "bone head" mistakes such as attempting to thread a 1 X 5 Acme thread in one pass at 10,000 SFM. for example see: http://www.fanuc.com / http://cs24i.fanucamerica.com/fa_training/course_cnc_prog.asp?Page scription&CourseID=7 http://www.cncezpro.com / http://www.toolingu.com/simulators.aspx
Your school may already have simulator programs available, or may purchase one if requested.
Good luck on your studies -- like most things the more time/effort you put into the studies the more you will get out.
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Suryakantd,
http://www.cncci.com has some good products.
Tom
PS...figures Cliff posted three times to this thread and none of them had anything to do with the OP's ON TOPIC request.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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