DFP cabling, Pendant moving, SOLVED.... part 3

Stanley Schaefer wrote:


I use a small drill vise to hold most connectors, while soldering. It has smooth jaws, and is all steel so it is heavy enough not to slide around the bench. I have one with 3" wide jaws that gets the most use. Another is 4", and is used when making adapters with short leads.
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wrote:

Yeah, but try holding an RCA connector in that vise... And then soldering the braid to it.
Stan
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I plug connectors like that into a piece of junk equipment. It holds things in place and acts as a heatsink.
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Cydrome Leader wrote:

I strip junk equipment. It takes up a lot less space.
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    [ ... ]

    The old RCA phono plug with the tulip-shaped backshell? Can you still get them in that format? The only ones which I have seen for years have been the ones with a screw-on secondary backshell, and a separate tab for the ground connection.
    And for the old style -- grip the connector in the vise by the pin -- after soldering the center connector into the pin so it is reinforced against crushing (ideally put it in a V in the vise jaw to keep it from moving while you are working), and keep the tulip backshell just above the jaws so they don't act as a heat sink.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

I recently bought some from http://www.MPJA.com They have the extra long center pin that's used by the switching RCA jacks, that Switchcraft and others make (or maybe 'made').
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Stanley Schaefer wrote:

I've done hundreds of them. Simply put a jack in the vise to hold the plug, or vise versa.
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On Thu, 02 May 2013 12:04:18 -0400, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I have a couple of toolmaker's vises, that I use for the same thing. Most connectors I fit (fortunately few, these days), are rectangular, although I do use them for holding the cable when soldering BNC center pins.
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    Yes -- Heathkit would void the warranty on any kit assembled with such a flux.

    Good plan.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 07:00:14 -0400, Existential Angst wrote:

On electrical connections?? Kerrist!
ZnCl plumbing flux is acidic, and *corrosive*. NEVER use it on electrical work.
Expect your joints to disappear over time.
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Existential Angst wrote:

Ohhh, Nooooo! You probably ARE going to have problems. That is the WRONG stuff to use. I have a bottle of GC rosin flux, which dries to a crumbly plastic sort of benign dust over time, and rarely causes any trouble, although it can become conductive if the climate is damp enough. But, the plumbing flux will eat up wiring and connectors. it wicks under the plastic insulation and eventually the wires get eaten through! It will probably take a few years for it to fail. You might slide back some of the heat shrink in six months and see if this is happening. If you see green goop, then you are in trouble.
Jon
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On Wed, 1 May 2013 07:00:14 -0400, "Existential Angst"

time.

Please, please tell me that you washed that off really well. If you didn't, you may be redoing the splice within a year.

chunk of

long

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Existential Angst wrote:

Well, glad you got it figured out! I do this sort of stuff often, and have the right gear, so it is easier. Yes, the good cable almost certainly has twisted pairs of wires. I'll bet the bad ones just have bundles of random wires in a jacket. You wouldn't know the difference just with an Ohmmeter, but it DOES make a big difference.
Jon
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On 01/05/13 05:20, Existential Angst wrote:

Was it ever DFP in the first place as wiki has DFP as 20 pin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Flat_Panel not 26 pin so maybe a Haas special on a similar connector.
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Googling returned both, and I was able to buy a 35 ft 26 pin dfp cable, but which caused boucou ghosting and substantial color shifts. Not sure what the story is with the 20 and 26 pin, but the 20 pin did seem more prevalent in the hits.
--
EA



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I haven't used them, but the "About Us" section says that they will make custom cables: http://cablesandconnectors.com/ Might be worth a shot.
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wrote:

I haven't used them, but the "About Us" section says that they will make custom cables: http://cablesandconnectors.com/ Might be worth a shot. ===========================================================Called'em up, nice bunch of guys, they even have dfp cables -- but only 6'. And they don't really get into making custom stuff from scratch, will mebbe fix certain kinds of cables, etc. Appreciate the link.
--
EA



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Oh well, they were somewhat close to you and I thought that they might do the dirty work (fabricate and check the cable impedance).
Another (long shot) link: http://www.pacificcable.com/Picture_Page.asp?DataName=HPC26MS Possibly you want "Half Pitch Centronics 26 pin male solderable" HPC26MS connectors. $6 each.
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Now, everytime I look at my crystal clear screen/splendidly re-located Haas pendant, all's I can visualize is my chemically crumbling splice -- all 26 of them.... LOL No breaks, no breaks....
--
EA




"Existential Angst" < snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net> wrote in message
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Well, you did it done. That's the most important part. Plus you told one heck of a humdinger story along the way. Welcome to your well deserved 15 minutes of well deserved fame.
?-)
On Wed, 1 May 2013 00:20:38 -0400, "Existential Angst"

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