IDC 40-pin connector for 80-conductor cable?

Looking for IDC male connector, 40-pin for 80-conductor ribbon cable.
This is used on IDE hard drives.
Or an 80-conductor cable with 1 each 40-pin male & female connectors.
Can't seem to find a source, but that is probably because I'm not using good search terms...
Anyone know where to find these?
Thanks.
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This results in reversing the pin assignments, ie, pin 1 connects to pin 2. Not good.
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"DaveC" wrote in message

This results in reversing the pin assignments, ie, pin 1 connects to pin 2. Not good.
--

Either the pins will be what he needs or a male connector won’t do it
wither. It will come out the same unless he twists some strands of the
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"m II" wrote in message

This results in reversing the pin assignments, ie, pin 1 connects to pin 2. Not good.
--

Either the pins will be what he needs or a male connector won’t do it
wither. It will come out the same unless he twists some strands of the
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I think you need to get two F connectors and try it yourself. Put them face to face. Pin 1 aligns with pin 2.
The M connector is *designed* to mate with the proper pins. F connectors were not designed for that.

<http://www.pacificcable.com/Picture_Page.asp?DataName=IDH40
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"DaveC" wrote in message

I think you need to get two F connectors and try it yourself. Put them face to face. Pin 1 aligns with pin 2.
The M connector is *designed* to mate with the proper pins. F connectors were not designed for that.

<http://www.pacificcable.com/Picture_Page.asp?DataName=IDH40
---------------- What you implied was to turn the male header/connector around and face it the other way (face to face means one is reversed). Of course it will be pin 1 to 2. The other side of the cable usually fixes that anyway, like the old days when the IDE cables had no orientation (not racism) gadgets on them.
Not a big deal for somebody without 3D dyslexia. I can prove that by attempting to do crown molding on the ceiling....LOL
mike
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No it doesn't.
There's no way to get 2 female connectors to mate pin 1 to pin 1.
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Op 3/7/2011 2:24 AM, DaveC schreef:

There are two types of connctors. One AMP and one other, i think ansley, but i'm not shure. They use different pins for the stiped wire. As long as you dont mix brands, you have no problems. But it can be used to switch pins.
--
pim.

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On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 20:46:16 +0100, the renowned tuinkabouter

Actually there are three kinds of connectors for this application and they are color-coded (black, blue and grey).
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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Suppose I have a gizmo that lets me connect female-female, but that scrambles the pinout. Does it get unscrambled if I use 2 of them in series? (adding a short chunk of cable with female-female.)
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Hal Murray wrote:

You might as well go to a 40 conductor cable if you do that. The 80 conductor cabe is a set of transmission lines and the reflections from a mix of 40 & 80 pin conductors will screw it up.
--
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Teflon coated.
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Let us know how it works out.
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put the female connector on the reverse side in one end?
might even add (or remove) the strain relief that go on top of some idc connector so the connectors will still look to be on the same side
-Lasse
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The configuration of IDC connectors is such that you can put the connector on either side of the cable (with the #1 pin indicator at the same end) and you maintain the same pin connections. In other words, you can't reverse pins by flipping the connector.
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On Sun, 6 Mar 2011 07:58:26 -0800, the renowned DaveC

I don't think you'll find them. The female connectors have shorting links inside and I don't think I've ever seen a male one. Maybe you'll have to lay out a PCB.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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DaveC wrote:

Unless I missed what you're saying, such a cable should be available at any good computer hardware store. E.g., Newegg has them under Computer Hardware -> Cables -> IDE. Some are specifically said to have 80 conductors, but all models specced for ATA133 should be 80-conductor types. http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N 10010001%20117752968&name=IDE?cm_spblessubcat001-_-flashstorefront-_-ide
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http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N 10010001%2011775

Those are cables with typically 1 female connector at one end and 2 female connectors at the other end.
I need 1 female and 1 male connector.
IDC male 40-pin for 80-conductor flat cable are apparently made from unobtainium...
Dave
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I don't think they make what you are looking for.
You might be able to fake it with a make-male gizmo. That is plug a bunch of pins into a female connectot to turn it into a make connector.
If you can't find something targeted at that use, a normal through-hole header might work. The board end will probably be too short. Mumble. Solder two together, or push the pins off a bit, or ...
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Hal Murray wrote:

It won't work. You can't just solder two connectors together. That will swap the odd & even pin numbers and short out the entire buss.
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DaveC wrote:

Oops. Sorry, I didn't read your post carefully enough. The time I needed *that* type of connector which was about 15 years ago for my Amiga, I made my own. I made a small pcb with two double rows of pads for header pins, spaced 0.1". The pins came from jumper headers salvaged from a dead PC card (everything had lots of jumpers those days). Rather tedious but I didn't have any alternative. One end of the female IDE cable plugged into one double row of pins and the other double row was free. If I had to make one again, I'd use a 40-pin IDC header block or the set of pins from an old IDE hard disk.
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