DB connectors

This might give you a starting point:
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Good Luck! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
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I need to make up connectors like you see on the back of a computer.
My servo amps have a couple 2 row 15 pin, a 2 row 25 pin, and a 3 row
26 pin places to connect.
I'm seeing a bewildering number of possibilities in digikey. FWIW the
connector plug I'm after is similar to this picture:
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or digikey part A32073-ND. I'm not after this part, just trying to
show the connector.
I'm not at all good at soldering in tight places. I much prefer
something that can be made up by crimping. I have a Molex type crimp
tool.
can someone suggest a good series of parts for this?
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Karl Have you ever used Mouser? Mouser.com
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Regards
Reply to
Dave B
OK, I selected crimp, then male and got this is the first part: 617-09-56-200-5601
Now do i need some sort of shell, some kind of pins, missing anything else? Any special tool?
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Just looked some more I think maybe crimp is for ribbon cable?? I have individual wires.
karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I always solder but here are the tools
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db
Reply to
Dave B

Make sure you look close at the tools as they are expensive.
I had ribbon cabbles made up today 2 @ 15 each took 10 minutes and saved me a headache.
db
Reply to
Dave B
I found a kit
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This kit looks great, i'd have everyting i need.
can't see how to navigate to get the right number of pins. AND they don't give prices withoug a major log in event. They won't get my business.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I have a good crimper I suppose i could use it for that if I had the correct die. After soldering connectors for many moons it never crosses my mind although crimp is nicer (neater) once you have the tool it last's a lifetime.
db
Reply to
Dave B
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I'm pretty sure they don't sell direct anyway. Digi-Key will have all you need. Just find the style of connector shells you like and the matching crimp pins. Easy stuff, and yes, the crimp pins are a lot easier to work with than the fixed solder cup connectors. Being the backup for your backup type, I tend to solder the pins after crimping them. Never had a problem with them. Be sure to get one of the pin removal tools as well in case you miss the correct hole and need to get the pin back out.
Reply to
Pete C.
Karl, they aren't that hard to solder if you pretin the wire & the terminal in the connector. Then put a drop of RMA liquid rosin flux on the terminal. Hold the tinned wire against the notch in the terminal & reheat. The wire will pus into the notch and you will have a clean joint without burning anything. make sure you use good solder, like Ersin (Multicore). Cheap solder is no bargain at any price.
I just clamp the connector in a small, smooth jawed drill press vise so i don't have to chase it around the bench. If I have many to do, I clamp a mating conncetor in the vise to safe time.
I can show you how when you pass through Ocala in a couple weeks if you'd like. I could even make the cables for you if your wire isn't already part of a machine.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
I just selected a bunch of solder type from digikey. I'll hire it out locally. I don't even try to solder anything smaller than #18 wire and it has to be to a through hole type pin. Its a skill I was poor at years ago, and I got worse.
karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I was partial to the crimp&shove type, primarily because one day some AMP rep gave me a crimper that would cost about $300.00 if you bought it. ;-)
And these things are almost free:
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Cheers! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
No, for ribbon you use IDC (Insulation Displacement Connectors).
For wires, you use individual pins, which usually come on a strip.
Do some googling, maybe for D-Sub tutorial?
Holy crap!
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;-)
Have Fun! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
This reminds me. If there's a lot of mechanical motion, the wires can break off at the pins, so you'd need the tool to pop them out; to prevent this, if there's an option available, get pins "with insulation support." There's one crimp around the wire, and a slightly larger crimp around the insulation, to act as sort of a strain relief.
Cheers! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
I always prefered the solder type, since they are easy to modify or re use. :)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Thanks for the mouser link. I got up this morning and quickly selected crimp connectors for just a few bucks. same stuff was $30 each at digikey. I just placed an order and I'll crimp as best I can with what I got and then solder reinforce. There's only four contacts used in each plug.
thanks again
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
There is another assembly option. Some places mass terminate solder cup type connectors using solder sleeves- a short piece of shrink tubing with a stripe of solder paste on the inside (Raychem is one manufacturer). Put the connector in a vise, put a solder barrel over each connector solder cup, strip the wire and poke it down into the desired solder cup. The solder barrel is able to hold the wire in place until all the wires are positioned. Hit the connector with a heat gun. The solder barrels shrink and the solder paste inside them melts, flows, and makes the connection. You end up with tight insulated connections.
Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
I use a small one like this:
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Stand the vise on end so the solder cups are horizontal with the notch up, and weight the wire to stay in place. Don't forget the heatshrink. The vise puts the work low enought that you can rest your hand on the bench to steady it.
DB connectors are a vacation at the beach compared to Lemo and Binder solder connectors:
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Except for not touching the tip I find puddle control for soldering and TIG welding very similar. I practiced joining 4130 tubing for the first time at school last night.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
(...)
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Mouser 530-40-9558M are pre-crimped.
You click the proper connector into the proper hole, fasten the hood in place and plug an RJ-45 modular cable in back.
Bob's Your Uncle.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston

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