DB connectors

Another method of wiring connectors with lots of contacts is resistance soldering where a tweezer-type tool heats the connection with a very low
voltage, moderately high current that passes thru the contact's solder cup, creating very localized heat.
The wire ends are stripped and tinned, and the solder cups at the ends of the contacts are tinned and partially filled with solder.
The tweezers are "pinched" onto the contact (each side of the solder cup), the resistance soldering station is energized (foot switch, typically), and the tinned wire end is pushed into the molten solder puddle in the cup as the heat increases to the flow temperature of the solder.
The current beiefly passes thru the contact, solder and wire end until the operator releases the foot switch, and then moves the tweezer tips to the next solder cup to repeat the process.
The tweezer tips only need to be kept clean (not tinned) so they can provide a good electrical connection with the contact or terminal to be soldered.
Te resistance soldering station provides a line/mains-isolated low voltage from a transformer that may have a variable duty cycle triac circuit, to adjust how fast the heat is generated in the contact. The variable duty cycle allows the operator to adjust/tune for different sized connections (very light duty for miniature contacts, or more sustained current cycles for heavy duty terminals).
--
WB
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"axolotl" < snipped-for-privacy@shorecomp.com> wrote in message
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wrote:

I use a small one like this: http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=328-0124&PMPXNO=24730466&PARTPG=INLMK32
Stand the vise on end so the solder cups are horizontal with the notch up, and weight the wire to stay in place. Don't forget the heatshrink. The vise puts the work low enought that you can rest your hand on the bench to steady it.
DB connectors are a vacation at the beach compared to Lemo and Binder solder connectors: http://www.binder-usa.com/psearch_detail.php?pid=6674
Except for not touching the tip I find puddle control for soldering and TIG welding very similar. I practiced joining 4130 tubing for the first time at school last night.
jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA28-0124?PMPXNO$730466?PARTPG=INLMK32
The worst were cables for old TV studio cameras with a lot of coax and different sized pins. It could take you days to do one plug. :(
RCA was bad enough, but I've heard that the Philips cables were so bad that guys would threaten to quit before they would repair one.
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA28-0124?PMPXNO$730466?PARTPG=INLMK32
I get:
'The Enco Model Number that you entered could not be located.'
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

That link worked.
Similar to the 4" one I use, and it cost me $7 new. :)
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On Thu, 04 Nov 2010 17:48:23 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

I got mine for free. it was my first machine shop project in 1974 for my manufacturing engineer design and build class. We started by casting the AL frame. Our team must have spent 400 hours setting up and making a dozen. No such thing as an NC machine in that class. The whole point of the class was to set up small scale manufacturing.
That class is when my love affair with metal mangling, and the machines that do it, began.
karl
Karl
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Karl Townsend wrote:

400 hours over 12 units isn't really free. ;)
I had mine and was using it in under an hour. :)
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On Thu, 4 Nov 2010 14:26:08 -0700 (PDT), Jim Wilkins

Excellent price. I paid $30 for a 3" sine from 800watt on eBay a few years ago.
-- Experience is a good teacher, but she send in terrific bills. -- Minna Thomas Antrim
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wrote:

Having soldered and crimped literally hundreds of DB-25s, I can say crimping is much faster, tool is much more expensive, though. If you're going to use this stuff on anything with a lot of vibration, go for the crimp. Eventually a soldered wire joint will fail just above where the pin is soldered on, given enough vibration. Found that out on the VW injection harness...
The pins are NOT Molex pins, you'll need either a different set of dies or a whole new crimper. Prices are all over the place depending on who's name is branded on its butt. Pins are pretty cheap, though. You'll want the special gizmo to remove pins, you WILL get one in the wrong hole eventually, trust me on this. Easier to swap crimped pins than to unsolder and resolder solder pot connectors.
Solder-pot connectors aren't that hard to do, it's just tedious work, tin wires, tin the pot, insert wire while heating pin, repeat ad nauseum. Helps to have the connector held in a vise, but I've done it hand-held.
If you really want to do a posh job, a short length of shrink tube right over the joints is the finishing touch. Gives a bit of strain relief and a bit of protection should something conductive make its way in.
Stan
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On 11/03/2010 06:51 PM, Karl Townsend wrote:

Crimpers for those things need to be high quality, and the decent ones cost $$$.
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Wescott Design Services
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wrote:

I guess I'll find out. I plan to crimp them with whatever I can come up with and then solder before inserting. Total cost was under $20 so I'm not out much if it don't work. Plan "B" would be to hire the job out and get the solder type.
Karl
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On 11/04/2010 04:44 PM, Karl Townsend wrote:

The pins have a round barrel into which you insert the wire. The crimper pushes four hardened pins into the barrel, dimpling it and pressing it onto the wire. Tres fancy. Because the barrel of the pin extends down into the hole in the housing you can't just crimp it by crushing it -- you have to do something that'll make it grip the wire without deforming it to the point where it won't go into its hole.
(I think the barrel is relieved where the crimper dimples it, so any little 'outies' don't interfere with putting it into the housing).
How far out in the boonies are you? Any electronics place that deals with DB connectors has a chance at having the crimper; if there's a contract cable assembly guy near you he'd probably be happy to make them up.
Note: I'd solder them myself, but I solder all the time. If I had to hire it done I'd either make damn sure the guy understood crimped DB connections, or I'd hire a kid to do the soldering and I'd stand over him for the first few connectors to make sure they were right. If I made more than 10 cables a year I'd probably buy a crimper -- but I make less than 1, on average.
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wrote:

Thanks for the info. i can duplicate that easily. I'll drill a hole in scrap stock to hold the pin. Then a cross hole to hold a center punch. Put wire and pin in there and give it a slight whack for an indent. Then solder it.
karl
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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    NO!
1)    Note that he said *four* hardened pins -- pushing equally from     four sides at 90 degree intervals, so the pin stays centered.
    If you do it with a center punch, things will be deformed in     such a way that they won't go into the hole in the connector     body well.
2)    The same with solder. (Aside from not having access for the     solder to the actual joint which is buried down in the tube, not     out where you can get to it.)
    And the solder will bulge out as well, to make it not fit well     in the connector body hole.
    *And* -- you won't be able to extract pins which wind up in the     wrong hole when (not if) you get one wrong. (You do need the     insertion/extraction tool to go with the pins.)
    There are two styles of pins to consider.
A)    The round machined pins which he described, which require     a *very* expensive crimper, a special bushing nest for each size     and gender of pin, and the machined pins are quite expensive     too.
B)    The ones with flag crimps. I've described this style before.
    The crimper for these is still expensive -- but less so, and a     lot easier to find on eBay at an affordable price. (The other     still leaves you with having to find the right bushing nests for     your pins.
    The flag crimp pins are significantly less expensive (but not     aerospace grade).
    An example of the first style of crimper is the Daniels:
<http://cgi.ebay.com/Daniels-DMC-AF8-Crimp-Tool-11851-M22520-1-01-Crimper-/150511878340?pt=BI_Electrical_Equipment_Tools&hash=item230b3500c4
    Auction # 230b3500c4 -- I think.
Note that the first row of pictures is the proper style of crimper, though no idea whether the bushing nest in there is right.
    The "doorknob" sticking out of the side is the bushing nest.
Some of the photos in the second row are for a larger style, designed for larger pins, with a bushing which changes between sizes (but none of them tht you need). No certainty which he is really selling. :-(
And *this* one looks like the one for the flag type terminals for the D series connectors (of which DB-25 is one size). It has two crimp dies, and two support holes for two different gauges of wire. (One crimp terminal is marked with a blue dot, the other with a red dot.
<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?VISuperSize&item#0527025153
    Auction # 230527025153 for sure.
    If you really care -- ask me, and I'll verify whether this is the right model by comparing it to what I have (after I dig them up). (90312-1).
    Good luck,         DoN.
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...

DAMN! Auction closed before I read your post. Yes, I'll buy the right tool. Would you help me find one on eBay, please.
I bought from mouser, part 09 56 200 5601 as one example. http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/HARTING/09-56-200-5601/?qs=sGAEpiMZZMu857ZbtCGHt%252bg0lJioweBEJJEPpKhSkeE%3d
also 15 pin and 25 pin. Looks like they have a good selection and cheap pricing.
DoN, Thanks for your offer to help, ahead of time. You are certainly the crimper expert on RCM.
Karl
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    [ ... ]

    Ouch! You missed a good price.
    A quick search for "AMP 90312-1" (without the quote marks) finds four at the moment. The second is at $29.99 while the other three are at $49.99, $65.00, and $65.99.
    The first one is missing the thing which holds the pins in the right position.
<http://cgi.ebay.com/AMP-CRIMPING-TOOL-90312-1-/360296722309?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item53e35baf85
    The second one ( the lower price) is also missing the pin holder. (You *can* hold them by hand, but it is easier with that to hold the pin, one hand to cycle the crimper handles, and the other to feed the wire in.)
<http://cgi.ebay.com/AMP-90312-1-HAND-CRIMPING-RATCHET-USED-/260686899383?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item3cb22668b7
    The third one ($65.00) has the pin holder. (So did the one which you missed.)
    And the forth one ($65.99) has it as well.
<http://cgi.ebay.com/AMP-90312-1-Crimp-Tool-/300358064015?pt=BI_Electrical_Equipment_Tools&hash=item45eebc578f
Unfortunately, the auctions no longer seem to have auction numbers which can be used for bringing up the auction without a long URL. :-(
    Those are the four at present. I would suggest that you go for one of the later two, as the pin holder will make it easier to use without an assistant.
    If you miss those -- use the search string which I showed up there, and look for ones with a black plastic lump on the back side of the crimp jaws.
    And -- from another posting, it seems that you got the more expensive Daniels connector -- which means that you need the proper bushing nest and the proper pins. (You will need the machined pins for that -- though they will fit in the same connector shells, except perhaps for the 26-pin one which I'm not sure about. They probably have pins to fit that too -- but perhaps a different bushing nest. The flag type terminals are a lot more affordable.

http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/HARTING/09-56-200-5601/?qs=sGAEpiMZZMu857ZbtCGHt%252bg0lJioweBEJJEPpKhSkeE%3d
    Hmm ... the 26-pin ones will use a different series of pins -- the smaller ones used in the VGA 15-pin connectors, except that this is the shell size for the DA-15 connector (except for having three rows of holes for smaller pins).

    There are certainly others -- I just spend more time typing what I know. :-) I've been interested in crimpers since about 1965 when I first learned about good ones.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 11/04/2010 11:17 PM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

>

Not to mention that the last 1/8" or so of the pin body is supposed to receive the insulation, for strain relief -- solder a wire straight into the pin and it'll just break off right at the pin.
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The Black Box Corp tool of this type is FT012 (made in U.S.A.) which is a compound-action, Sargent-style tool with a ratchet-cycle mechanism.
The BB FT012 that I have has 3 integrated crimper jaw sets, for 28-24, 24-20 and 18-16 gage wires.
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WB
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Karl Townsend wrote:

Just solder them, Karl. :)
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