Welding a pipe fitting to the bottom of the coolant tank...

Awl--
Good idear, bad idear, pointless idear?
Since I haven't filled the tank yet, this is the time to weld it, if it's a
good idea. Ahm thinkin iffin I ever need to drain the tank, this might be handy. Cuz the tank was a bitch to drain last time. Or would one of these mini-giant submersibles do as well?
In fuel oil tanks, it is illegal (at least in NY) to have any fitting other than at the top, lest it break. ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
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PV,
I just put a "Y" and a 1/4 turn ball valve with a hose bib thread in the coolant output just above the check valve. Attach a "good quality" garden hose and a pistol grip nozzel. Great for washing away chips between parts, and keeping the machine clean. It won't drive chips into cracks the way air does.
It's also a handy way to drain the tank. Just run a hose to wherever and turn on the pump.
Regards
Mark

a
other
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air
Along these lines.........NEVER USE A PRESSURE WASHER ANYWHERE NEAR THE SPINDLE--you will trash the bearings, guaranteed !!!
--
SVL





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air
... standard equipment on a Haas... :-))
And yes, the easiest way to drain the tank. Won't get the last bit, tho. I usually drain until the pump sucks air, then roll the tank out from under the machine and tilt it up to get more out. The last bit I bail out with a plastic pitcher. Then the fun begins....
--Mitch
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garden
parts,
I
a
Yeah yeah... when the drain is 1 in offa the floor its real eas to find a container thats 1/2 in offa the floor...
Gimme a break.
--
SVL




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Good point... unless you're in the habit of just letting it run out the door and into the nearest sewer, as it seems some people who have posted here do...
Just to clarify, as my post may have been confusing - I don't have a drain on my tank, I use the coolant pump as much as possible, then bail the rest by hand. Just roll the drum over to the machine, take the sprayer off the hose, stick it in the bung hole and put a weight on it, and hit the "coolant" button... That's not the bad part, cleaning the sludge adhering to the tank walls and bottom afterward is.... But I only do this about once a year, year and a half... The whole thing takes me a couple of hours or so, but I do clean well. -- Cheers,
--Mitch
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a
once
Just pulling your chain a bit is all--we recycle all used coolant these days.........
--
SVL



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Not ecologically kopacetic, f'sure. How 'bout taking the trouble to lug sed 55 gal drum to a loiyer's waiting room, and punching a hole in the barrel right there?? Even better: cutting oil. Even better--oh, better not.... Oz (on cable) absolutely scared the crap out of me--I'm still too pretty....
But the problem w/ fadals, mine at least, is that the impeller of the pump is a good few inches from the tank bottom. I would say when the pump hits air, there's about 1/3 of the tank left. The advantage of this design, intended I would assume, is that w/ the impeller sitting that high you also don't pick up crud, and can run longer between tank cleanings. In my old shop's case, oh, about 8 years. Another disadavantage is that the impeller then splashes coolant out of the tank (I'm pretty sure).
But, I found a submersible, which, if you put *that* upside down, will just about scrape the bottom. Proly the best compromise. ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll

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The easiest way....
http://www.masterchemical.com/4/frames.html
We use these very successfully. Our units hold 300 gal and are LP powered (we have two for the entire plant). They have units as small as 65 gal and powered via 110V single phase. Our units will empty an 80 gal sump tank in less than a minute, figure 5 more minutes to vacuum up all the sludge/chips and you are done.
--
Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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Anthony wrote:

I made a venturi system that will suck a sump dry and put it right into a 55 gal. drum. IT works on shop air. They sell kits for this too. they work great. They will suck up just about anything including sluge and chips.
John
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We have one from Exair: http://www.exair.com/ind_hskpg_products/dv_page.htm It's reversible, so you can fill the coolant tank or empty it. It will fill a 45 gallon coolant tank in seconds wide open, so you better be holding on to the hose tight with one hand and the shut off valve with the other. It's good sport to let a newbie loose with it. Did you know that the average newbies clothes will absorb about two gallons of cutting oil? I always tell them to hold the hose and open the valve slowly, but hey what do I know.
Dan
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a
other
I just use the machine's coolant pump--gets most of it.....the rest I suck out with a shop vac.....
For disposal, I put it into a 55 gal drum and then take a drive over to the nearest Boeing facility....uncork it in the parking lot at night during a rainstorm....
--
SVL



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2 words for y-all - WET-VAC!

a
other
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| Awl-- | | Good idear, bad idear, pointless idear? | | Since I haven't filled the tank yet, this is the time to weld it, if | it's a good idea. Ahm thinkin iffin I ever need to drain the tank, | this might be handy. Cuz the tank was a bitch to drain last time. | Or would one of these mini-giant submersibles do as well?
Just a word of advice: drain the tank before you weld it on.
moT
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Proctologically Violated wrote:

it's a

might be

Actually, most hardware stores have a plumbing section. Think of sink drains & toilet tank fittings with rubber/elastomeric seals & almost flush mountings (or you can cut stuff off).
Anyone know which rubbers/elastomers work best with cutting fluids? Some might degrade in oils I expect. Make your own with RTV Silicone rubber (wax surfaces so it will release)?
Then all you'd need is a hole...... but should you flush? -- Cliff
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