AC line measures 27V

Does anyone have any ideas about this. I am using a digital multi tester and am getting a reading of 27v on an 20amp ac circuit. I have
used this tester many times to measure circuits. I tested other outlets just to make sure the tester is functioning properly and I am getting about 122v. This line had old florescent lights connected to it. The lights didn't work well but I thought it was because they were
old. I also used a simple voltage tester (100-250v). The light does not come on but does when I use it on other outlets. I do have the tester set to AC. I am not reading mV. The line is coming from a junction box with several other wires. I do not have any other outlets
or lights that are not working. This is an old house with some updated
wiring
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

replace light switch
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On 10/23/06 8:09 PM, in article hKadnUz60qGUGaDYnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.com, "TimPerry"

It is possible that you have a bad neutral or bad connection aside from a bad light switch. Measure voltage from each conductor to ground with your high impedance voltmeter. They should be close to 120 and 0 respectively. That should indicated which side has a poor connection.
Bill -- Fermez le Bush
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Salmon Egg wrote:

Thanks for the info.
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i once ran into a case where oxidized fuses dropped that much voltage. burnishing the contacts and fuses cured the problem (and burnt the chili simmering on the electric stove in another building)
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Salmon Egg wrote:

Could also be a phantom voltage caused by capacitive currents between wires. For example, capacitance between a hot and switch-leg run to an open switch can produce a small current that will result in a voltage reading on a high resistance digital meter measuring switch-leg to neutral. There would have to be no load (light bulb) on the circuit. Measuring the voltage with a low resistance meter or attaching a light bulb across the meter leads will make the voltage disappear.
bud--
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Bud-- wrote:

Replaced the switch. All is well. Thanks to all.
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wiring
you are welcome.
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On 10/24/06 3:58 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@f16g2000cwb.googlegroups.com,

Now that you mention it, a good test would have been to put the voltmeter across the switch when it was in the on (and off) position. That is also a good way to check for open fuses.
Bill -- Fermez le Bush
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Maybe as suggested your light switch is bad. If it happens to be a lighted one with a 90V Neon, that might account for 27V reading 117 - 90 = 27 V.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

--
Joe Leikhim K4SAT
"The RFI-EMI-GUY"
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