Another transmission line question...

Hello again,
Sorry, I have another (possibly stupid) transmission line question...
I noticed that the three lines on one side of the tower have
insulators with smaller diameter than those on the other side:
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Although the length of the insulators is the same, my guess is that
one side (the one with smaller insulators) is at lower voltage than
the other side. One reason I could think of why the insulators for
the (possibly) different voltages are the same length is the geometry
of the tower - insulators form a "V" shape. Is this the case?
Regards,
- Alex
Reply to
Alexander Avtanski
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Hi Bill,
The towers have six lines - three phases on one side, three phases on the other. The three on one side were with insulators different diameter but same length than the three on the other side.
Reply to
Alexander Avtanski
In that case it probably is two different circuits at two different voltages.
I suppose another possibility is that the towers were erected to take two circuits (six lines) but only one circuit was installed at the time. Later they installed a second circuit with insulators from a different manufacturer, perhaps of a better material that allows them to be a smaller diameter.
Reply to
Michael Moroney
Same sized conductors on either side?
Its possible that either side was reconductored or otherwise upgraded at different times and the insulator change reflects a better or just different specification or technology available at the time.
Reply to
Paul Hovnanian P.E.
For some reason the insulators that are different are for the same voltage rating but are Polymer vs the older style porcelain insulators. More and more of these will be seen as they do have some advantages. The reason for this is unknown to all but the people who designed the line. Are all insulators on the one side the same from tower to tower? If so, I would suggest that these were a cautious experiment at the time the line was built - otherwise, it may be a replacement of a faulty or damaged insulator string.
Reply to
Don Kelly
Sorry, I missed the details in your first paragraph. The second 3 phase line with the polymer insulators was added to the towers at a later date than the first 3 phase line as indicated by Paul- who knows his stuff.
Reply to
Don Kelly
I'll guess (and that's what it is) that the length of the insulators is a function of the voltage; but the smaller diameter has to do with the forces on them.
Tomsic
Reply to
Tomsic
Nice discussion -- didn't know that polymers were able to replace porcelain for such insulators.
Tomsic
Reply to
Tomsic
See
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They have been around for some time and have some advantages/disadvantages. By the way the diameter of a porcelain insulator is simply to provide the necessary surface leakage distance- the string is made up of multiple units and the load bearing region is between the metal top cap and the metal bottom pin If a unit is damaged or broken, it can be replaced. Tempered glass insulators are made the same way-- an advantage is that if it is damaged, structural strength is retained but the skirts disappear so it is easy to spot damage. On the other hand some utilities in Western Canada and USA don't use them as they are too tempting to people with 22's who shoot at them- and see them explode- great fun! With porcelain insulators, the shooter may not even know if he hit the insulator-boring!
Reply to
Don Kelly

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