Arc-Fault Interuptor Breakers

| It will be interesting what changes jurisdictions make when they accept | the 2008 NEC. If, for example, SquareD does not have the new AFCIs
| available does that mean you can't use SquareD panels.
I'm already planning to go with C-H panels.
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| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
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On Thu, 19 Apr 2007 21:31:35 -0400 snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: | On 20 Apr 2007 01:04:47 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote: | |>| Most AFCI trips get traced back to ground/neutral faults. That is |>| where the ceiling fans got that bad reputation. It was usually that |>| big cludge wirenut vibrating into the hickey when the fan was running. |>| The original AFCI designs (for the arc fault part) were only looking |>| for short duration current spikes in the 70a+ range. They just detect |>| dead shorts from line to neutral. The GFCI protection was added to |>| find shorts from neutral or line to ground at the 30ma level. |> |>That's not what some aspects of what I read say. There have been documents |>(I didn't keep them handy) that described "series arcs" as arcs due to a |>loose connection that isn't a short circuit path. The arc transients would |>therefore have no more increase than what the load is, plus or minus any |>circuit/load reactive components affecting it. |> |>-- | | There are not any "series arc" detectors out there yet., Siemens is | bragging about having one but it isn't really for sale. | The "combination" AFCI refers to being able to detect parallel arcs in | the wall plus an arc in a line cord. It is a lower level of current | detection when looking at a potential arc.
What is the difference between those kinds of arcs that would require a combination device to detect either?
So if I take a power cord with a plug on one end, and open stranded wire on the other end, plug the plug into a 120V output, and take the open ends (held by the insulation), and just quickly slap them across each other and back apart again (with eyes turned away), if a magnetic trip doesn't open on that (and I suspect it won't ... don't try this at home), would an AFCI catch it and open when a magnetic trip won't?
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| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
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On 22 Apr 2007 00:39:26 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote:

The difference is available fault current. You may never generate the 75a on the end of an 18ga lamp cord, particularly if it was connected in a flaky 43 cent receptacle with loose contacts.
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