Breaking of Universal Motor

Hi Everyone
I am working on a project where I am utilizing a motor form a normal power drill to drive a lift up and down I choose the drill motor because it comes
complete with gearbox, is reversible and cheap.
However, I now experience too much free run after I have released the up/down button. Is there a good way to break such a standard "Universal motor"?
Thank you
Rasmus S. Eriksen
Copenhagen, DK
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Rasmus Solmer Eriksen wrote:

I think that word that you need to search on is "brake" rather than "break".
However, have you tried shorting the motor out - rather than leaving it open circuit, in the "off" position?
Essentially, you need to absorb the kinetic energy by dumping it into something. There is a wide range of small electromagnetic brakes available -
Try http://uk.rs-online.com/web/ and search on "electromagnetic brake", for examples.
IIUC, they have a branch in Copenhagen..
-- Sue
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You mean "brake", as in slow down, not "break" as in damage.
The problem I can see with a series universal motor is that it will make a lousy generator. Can you find a drill that uses a permanent magnet DC motor instead? Portable (battery powered) drills all seem to use PMDC motors, and I've seen AC line-powered routers with PMDC motors, so perhaps there are line-powered drills with such motors too.
The advantage of a permanent magnet motor is that it makes an excellent generator, and if you connect the motor terminals to a low-valued resistor you get a nice braking torque that's proportional to current. If the load is a resistor, current and torque should be proportional to shaft speed.
    Dave
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Dave Martindale wrote:

If it is a reversible motor maybe a short shot of reversing on shutdown? Eric
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Eric wrote:

That's referred to by some as 'plugging' a motor. It used to be quite common in a lot of controllers for conveyors and that ilk. The trick is cutting off the power just as the shaft reaches a dead stop. Some old systems used simple switches that were driven by the shaft through a friction clutch. As soon as the shaft stopped, a spring would open the switch and kill the plugging circuit.
daestrom
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That would require switching to reverse the connections to either the rotor or the "field" plus additional switching to meter out a short reverse shot.
With about the same amount of switching (or less), one could arrange to short out the armature and place a DC current on the field windings.
I haven't throught through what would happen if one simply shorted out the brushes and maintain AC on the field. I suspect that would also quickly slow down the motor.
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Rasmus Solmer Eriksen brought next idea :

You could use DC braking.
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Arlowe wrote:

A universal motor runs on AC or DC. That's why it's called 'Universal'.
There are electromagnetic brakes availible.
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on 9/20/2008, Michael A. Terrell supposed :

My apologies... I just had a "duh" moment :)
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Yes, I am looking for a electrical solution. The problem with utilizing DC-breaking is the non-existence of a magnetic stator field when the motor is not energized. Somehow I need to energize the stator coil and short-circuit the rotor coil to achieve braking.
I have seen such a system working on a Bosh power drill but have been unable to reverse-engineer the solution.
/Rasmus S. Eriksen

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