C9 lights/fuses

In keeping with the Christmas spirit I came across a box of old C9
strings of light (one tag has a date of 01/87). We hooked ~6 strands
together and after ~30 minutes blew a fuse. When I removed the first
fuse(which was obviously blown) I noticed that whoever hooked them up
before had put in a 10amp fuse instead of the 7amp/125volt max listed
on the fuse box. I replaced the fuse with the correct fuse and it blew
after ~5 minutes. I realize that I could buy new sets but it was just
kindof neat to find and use these. Since the wrong fuse was in there
do you think that set is ruined or is there another reason that might
cause it to blow(even with the right fuse)? (FYI - the remainder of
the strands fuses are still fine). Thanks for any input you can give
me.
Reply to
ashekita
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| In keeping with the Christmas spirit I came across a box of old C9 | strings of light (one tag has a date of 01/87). We hooked ~6 strands | together and after ~30 minutes blew a fuse. When I removed the first | fuse(which was obviously blown) I noticed that whoever hooked them up | before had put in a 10amp fuse instead of the 7amp/125volt max listed | on the fuse box. I replaced the fuse with the correct fuse and it blew | after ~5 minutes. I realize that I could buy new sets but it was just | kindof neat to find and use these. Since the wrong fuse was in there | do you think that set is ruined or is there another reason that might | cause it to blow(even with the right fuse)? (FYI - the remainder of | the strands fuses are still fine). Thanks for any input you can give | me.
Did you cascade the strings by connect the next string into the pluggable end of the previous, thus pulling the load of all strings through the first plug?
How many bulbs? What wattage each? C9's are a bit larger and probably a higher wattage than the more common C7's for line voltage use.
The C9's I've seen in the past were also designed for outdoor use.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
We just had a C-9 conversation here and today I tested a 100 bulb string. It pulls just a tad over 5a or about 6w per bulb
Reply to
gfretwell
| |>|> |>| In keeping with the Christmas spirit I came across a box of old C9 |>| strings of light (one tag has a date of 01/87). We hooked ~6 strands |>| together and after ~30 minutes blew a fuse. When I removed the first |>| fuse(which was obviously blown) I noticed that whoever hooked them up |>| before had put in a 10amp fuse instead of the 7amp/125volt max listed |>| on the fuse box. I replaced the fuse with the correct fuse and it blew |>| after ~5 minutes. I realize that I could buy new sets but it was just |>| kindof neat to find and use these. Since the wrong fuse was in there |>| do you think that set is ruined or is there another reason that might |>| cause it to blow(even with the right fuse)? (FYI - the remainder of |>| the strands fuses are still fine). Thanks for any input you can give |>| me. |> |>Did you cascade the strings by connect the next string into the pluggable |>end of the previous, thus pulling the load of all strings through the first |>plug? |> |>How many bulbs? What wattage each? C9's are a bit larger and probably a |>higher wattage than the more common C7's for line voltage use. |> |>The C9's I've seen in the past were also designed for outdoor use. | | | | We just had a C-9 conversation here and today I tested a 100 bulb | string. It pulls just a tad over 5a or about 6w per bulb
There are two different bulb wattages available for c9. I recall around 7w (maybe it's effectively 6w) and 10w. I have different wattages on c7's.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
I doubt there is enough quality control in that chinese factory to really assign a watt value but four 25 bulb strinbgs averaged 6w per bulb. I didn't really see any significantly brighter than others as a significant increase in wattage would suggest.
Reply to
gfretwell
There are 6 strings of lights(25 lights per string) connected end-end and then connected to a large outdoor extension cord. The lights do not have the wattage on them but they say 120 volts. One site I just came across recommended only hooking up 3 strands end-to-end, so maybe that is my problem?
Reply to
ashekita
I just bought a C7 LED string - 100 feet, 100 bulbs, 8 watts total. It is a series parallel arrangement: 5 bulbs in series drop ~24 volts, and that is repeated 5 times to make one series string of 25 LEDs. 4 of those 25 bulb strings are wired in parallel in the 100 foot overall string. The LED arraingement is clever: red, green, blue, yellow and amber. I used a variable DC supply through a limiting resistor and cranked the current up to 20 mA. I tested 1 bulb at a time to measure VF: Blu - 3.33 Yel - 2.02 Red - 2.0 Grn - 3.3 Amber - 13.3 !!
I dremeled the amber assembly open and there's a (measured) 556 ohm resistor in series with that LED.
I was impressed with the safety advantage this kind of string offers. The bulbs are shatterproof and molded to the wire. They don't produce heat like incandescants. At less than 70 mA, voltage drop in the wire is negligible, so daisy chaining won't get you in trouble. They are double fused which will protect against a short in the wire, which appears to be of good quality. I boiled one bulb assembly for about 1/2 hour - not a hint of softness in the assembly, which remained unable to be pulled apart no matter how hard I tried. I grabbed it with slip lock pliers immediately after pulling it from the boiling water, so I was trying it while it was hot. I tested the bulb again after it cooled, and it performed as before.
The thing cost $15.95 at Price Club - looking at it another way, that's 16 cents per LED! By comparison, Mouser shows the cheapest blues for 60 cents each, unless I missed something.
Ed
Reply to
ehsjr
| |>| We just had a C-9 conversation here and today I tested a 100 bulb |>| string. It pulls just a tad over 5a or about 6w per bulb |> |>There are two different bulb wattages available for c9. I recall around 7w |>(maybe it's effectively 6w) and 10w. I have different wattages on c7's. | | I doubt there is enough quality control in that chinese factory to | really assign a watt value but four 25 bulb strinbgs averaged 6w per | bulb. I didn't really see any significantly brighter than others as a | significant increase in wattage would suggest.
It could be the bulbs that claim as 7w are really just 6w. That's very plausible. You may be able to find 10w bulbs and they may only be 9w.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
|> |> |> Did you cascade the strings by connect the next string into the pluggable |> end of the previous, thus pulling the load of all strings through the first |> plug? |> |> How many bulbs? What wattage each? C9's are a bit larger and probably a |> higher wattage than the more common C7's for line voltage use. |> |> The C9's I've seen in the past were also designed for outdoor use. |> |> - snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com | | There are 6 strings of lights(25 lights per string) connected end-end | and then connected to a large outdoor extension cord. The lights do | not have the wattage on them but they say 120 volts. One site I just | came across recommended only hooking up 3 strands end-to-end, so maybe | that is my problem?
At 6w each, that will be 7.5 amps at 120 volts, enough to eventually blow that 7 amp fuse. If they are 7w each, that's even more. Just split the strings.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam

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