Electrical Contact Material

Andrew Gabriel:
But also to clean the build-up of magnetic material on floppy disc readers' heads.
Do anybody here use a pencil (or even, for thick oxydations, pen) eraser to clean contacts?
Reply to
F. Bertolazzi
Loading thread data ...
It's not at all clear what the OP is trying to do. Seems like a little gold flash over his phosphur bronze might get rid of the oxide issue?
George H.
Reply to
George Herold
F. Bertolazzi Inscribed thus:
Yes ! I've used pencil erasers to clean fingering on PCB contacts.
Reply to
Baron
John Fields Inscribed thus:
Certain types of gaming machines use a stack of rotating disks of SRBP material, similar construction to a HDD platter stack, with phosphor bronze contact strips and sterling silver studs to determine payout values. The contact strips when not in contact with the studs are in continuous contact with the SRBP disk. Surprisingly over a long period of time grooves are formed in the SRBP disk surface. Since there is 240v 50Hz present on the contact studs, debris from the continual friction can cause arcing and breakdown of the SRBP material. The point being is that these things run reliably for years without maintenance.
Reply to
Baron
Our field service staff had a sort of glass fiber propelling pencil for that. It was like a very thick propelling pencil, but instead of pencil lead, it had a dense mass of fine glass fibers, which wore down over time.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
Even with gold there is still the issue of having to clean the contacts.
P.S.: I don't know if anyone else has this issue, but Google Groups will not let me post in another thread here that I started called. Making cables". I've attempting to post a response for the last three days. Has anyone else had a problem like this?
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Reply to
Searcher7
When I was an amusement machine repairmen, the company issued a thing that the boss called a "fiberglass eraser" for cleaning edge connector contacts.
It was just a bundle of stiff glass fibers in a plastic tube with a screw to extend the bundle of fibers as they wore down, and it worked a treat!
It didn't leave any rubber residue like a pencil eraser might have.
Cheers! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
To me, it sounds like a homework problem; I invented some contacts once; actually, I rescued them from a retired relay and just changed the mechanical configuration; this guy sounds like he's trying to reinvent the whole concept of relay contacts, or either he's a troll, twitting us all.
Isn't it frustrating when someone comes in and asks a question, and answer after answer, he says, "No, that's not it..."
After about three of those kind of responses, I just put them on my "ignore" list. Sometimes I say, "Well, what the hell _do_ you want to hear?"
Cheers! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
WHAT THE FUCK ARE YOU TRYING TO ACCOMPLISH? People have been doing this stuff for decades! What's impelling you to reject every reasonable answer you've gotten? Are you on a secret mission from an alien planet or what?
Or are you just another damned troll?
Thanks, Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
Andrew Gabriel:
Yes, it's an eraser for china ink used by achitects on tracing paper. Very effective. Maybe too much.
Reply to
F. Bertolazzi
John Fields:
Now I understand why you had to deal with drydocks. Usually those places are populated with retarded monkeys, you did not seem to fit wery well there (apart from the fact that you're an asshole. Now we're even, peace).
I've been on board one of those "oceanographic" vessels. Their base in the west Mediterranean is in La Spezia, 100 km from here.
Yeah, sure, nothing to deal with russian submarines. ;-)
A couple of weeks ago I "repaired" a friend's "boom box" the same way.
Reply to
F. Bertolazzi
It would appear the OP does not really know what he wants, cannot explain it, and it "rolls" each time he learns a little more about what he wants by reading posts.
It's not at all clear what the OP is trying to do. Seems like a little gold flash over his phosphur bronze might get rid of the oxide issue?
George H.
Reply to
Josepi

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.