Electrical Contact Material

On Sun, 16 Jan 2011 08:21:22 -0800 (PST), George Herold


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Maybe, maybe not.

If there's a wear issue, then the gold flash will just be wasted but
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John Fields wrote:

To me, it sounds like a homework problem; I invented some contacts once; actually, I rescued them from a retired relay and just changed the mechanical configuration; this guy sounds like he's trying to reinvent the whole concept of relay contacts, or either he's a troll, twitting us all.
Isn't it frustrating when someone comes in and asks a question, and answer after answer, he says, "No, that's not it..."
After about three of those kind of responses, I just put them on my "ignore" list. Sometimes I say, "Well, what the hell _do_ you want to hear?"
Cheers! Rich
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transformer paper is wood fibre impregnated with some sort of heat resistant resin. 15mil is approximately business-card thickness. in my experience it's much stiffer than ordinary paper products.
If you don't like that you could try FR-2 or FR-4 printed circuit board material, FR-2 is wood-fibre based FR-4 is glass-fibre based.
FR4 is available in amny different thicknesses.
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Well, with glass, being harder than steel, those contacts would abrade, i.e. wear.
The x-former paper is the standard in so many sci circles where electrical isolation is required. There are even zero outgass varieties for high vacuum use.
Pieces of ARE in fact used as structural elements in mechanical systems as well. It is cheaper than circuit board media, and they make it in sheets... big sheets.
Cut to order or sent in 4 foot wide rolls if ye like. Google Du Pont Nomex
I'll bet some kid could make one of those gravity cars from it and do well. Strong stuff. :-)
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Searcher7 wrote:

sacrificial anode ?
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On Sat, 15 Jan 2011 18:57:55 -0500, Jamie

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Since when is a sacrificial anode non-conducting and, why would he
want to fill up the relay with a conductive fluid???
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John Fields wrote:

The idea was to attract erosion else where.
Guess you've never seen S-anode contacts. Similar to wetting.
Jamie
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On Sun, 16 Jan 2011 09:51:37 -0500, Jamie

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Yes, of course, but how would you go about doing that on relay
contacts using a non-conductive "anode"?
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Josepi wrote:

In English, "burnishing."
Cheers! Rich
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.
I don't think that anyone understood what I just asked. But just in case the responders didn't read the entire thread, this is an innovative project.
A) It doesn't yet exist.
B) What is presently commercially available in parts will not be sufficient for my needs.
C) And I'm searching for a good material that can be used for wiping Phosphor-Bronze contacts. A material that is *not* electrically conductive.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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Searcher7 wrote:

Wiping as in cleaning?
Crocus cloth.
Cheers! Rich
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Searcher7 Inscribed thus:

In that case paper will do what you want ! ie think paper towel.
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Best Regards:
Baron.
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On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 20:25:40 -0800 (PST), Searcher7

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Would you explain how the wiping is to be done?

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TP? (sorry)
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Searcher7 wrote:

A piece of tinplate (tin-plated steel) cut from the lid of a "tin" can.
You could either use two, or the other contact could be a brass nail.
The action of the movement of the contacts will knock off the oxide when they make contact.
Good Luck! Rich
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Usually the contacts are arranged so that they wipe against each other.
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On Sat, 4 Dec 2010 15:42:37 -0800 (PST), Searcher7

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So what are you doing?

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