Electrical Power: Neutral and Ground

QUESTION: Is it correct that in a power outlet in India the 'Neutral' port gets connected to the 'Ground' port at the power transmitting end,
while the 'Earth' port gets connected to the metal body of the connected appliance? If this is true, then picture / consider this. SCENARIO: During the positive half cycle of the sine 240VAC wave, electrical energy @ 120VAC flows out of the 'Phase' port into and through the load to complete the electrical circuit. During the negative half cycle of the sine 240VAC wave, electrical energy @ 120VAC flows out of the 'Neutral' port into and through the load to complete the electrical circuit.Thus, we get electrical power @ 240VAC. If Neutral is connected to Ground at the power transmitting end, then 120VAC should be flowing into the ground and not through the load impedance. Electrical energy takes the path of least resistance. Then, how do we get 240VAC electrical power? Please reply to snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com also.
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On 26 Jul 2006 03:07:05 -0700, "SandeepSubrati"

The actual earth connection should not be carrying current. That neutral point also connects back to the transformer and that is the current path. The connection to earth is only to stabilize that system to a common potential in reference to earth. It will swing 120v above zero and on the second half of the cycle it will swing 120v below zero, giving you 240. (actually the peak to peak is 1.4 times that but we talk about the RMS "effecrtive" power)
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An easier way to visulize and test the 120/240V concept is to take two 1.5V batteries. Place them end to end. You need a wire connection to both ends and the middle between the two batteries. Also, run an earth ground to the middle connection.
You now have three wires. #1 is one end #2 is the other end #3 is the middle grounded connection
The voltages would be: #1 - #2 - 3V #1 - #3 - 1.5V #2 - #3 - 1.5V
The #3 wire is what is called the neutral connection. This is exactly the same as how a 120/240v system works.
Chuck
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