Frequency-to-voltage and visa versa at 1.602 10^- 19 volt.

wrote in http://groups.google.com/group/sci.physics/msg/90cf40e26172180f?hl =en :


Well, the voltage is not exactly 1.602 10^-19 but close. Right?

r
If 1.602 10^-19 volt is too small, then what is the smallest physically-possible voltage that can be detected or processed given the state of today's technology?
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GreenXenon wrote:
...

First learn the difference between an electron-volt and a volt. Then explain why your question happens to assume a voltage that is numerically equal to the charge on an electron. An answer to your question will make more sense to you if you can do that. Asi it is, you're just using words that you don't understand to imply assertions that aren't valid.
Jerry
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Jerry Avins wrote:

Please don't feed the 'Radium' troll.
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You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense!

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On Mon, 01 Jun 2009 10:49:48 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Jeez, is that who this dumbfuck greenbabyshithead is?
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Ok. What is the smallest physically-possible voltage that can be detected or processed given the state of today's technology?
The maximum voltage I prefer is 0.56 because that is the max one can get *without*:
1. Exceeding the dielectric strength of any electronic component
2. Generating temperatures above 70 Fahrenheit in any electronic component
3. Ionizing any electronic component
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0.56 volts at 1000 amp equals 560 watts, which will get most anything warmer than 70 F.
Babbling, trolling idiot.
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Jim Pennino

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wrote:

Easy. If the background temperature is 70 F, then 0 Watts.
Charles Perry P.E.
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On Mon, 1 Jun 2009 07:01:27 -0700 (PDT), GreenXenon

Ever heard of a femtovolt?
Your FM receiver antenna picks up about 2 or 3 femtovolts from the airwaves. That ends up getting tuned in as your stereo media source.
quoted:
The SI derived unit for voltage is the volt. 1 volt is equal to 1.0E+15 femtovolt.
Now stop being a cross posting retard when you make these stupid queries that you are even too dumb to do a simple research hunt for.
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You need to say that with a John Wayne inflection, as in:
"Yer jus' spittin' out words to see where they splatter..."
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Zero watts.
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Jim Pennino

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On Mon, 01 Jun 2009 20:45:02 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

Well, not quite. Zero watts won't _raise_ the temperature at all. ;-)
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Correct, and it is the only power level guaranteed not to exceed 70 F based on the conditions of the question, and there aren't any.
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