Grounding of outside over the air antenna and dish network sat dish

I had a dish network sat dish and outside over the air tv antenna mounted t o a tower until a storm blew through recently and blew the tower over. The
person that installed the dish installed a coax grounding block near the po int of entrance of the coax into the house. Both the over the air coax as w ell as the sat coax were connected to this block. A ground wire ran from th is block about 12 inches to a power cut off box for my outside ac condenser . (Is this legal/proper?)
Anyway, I never had any problems out of the system. Years ago I had a groun d rod at the tower and had nothing but problems with lightening strikes. Wh en the person grounded it to the ac unit thus connecting it to house ground , I never had a problem.
The sat was re installed near its original location except to the eave of t he house. I have been thinking of installing my new antenna and rotor on my vinyl chimney. Currently the chimney is not used, I don't even have gas lo gs although some day I might.
I guess my question is, can I install this set up on my chimney, running my new coax down the side of the house to a new grounding coax block, then ru nning a ground wire from the coax block into the crawlspace to a junction b ox that is already in the crawlspace? (Thus grounding the coax to the house ground).
Also, I noticed that even before, the installer grounded my coax for both t he tv antenna and the sat dish but the masts for each were not connected to any ground. Should they be?
I appreciate any advice.
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On 7/10/2014 6:38 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Answers are for the US, covered by the NEC.
All coax must go through a ground block that is connected to the building earthing system. That ground wire "shall be as short as practicable". If it is over 20 ft a separate ground rod at the point of entry is required. A separate rod may not protect electronics inside the house.
Connection to the A/C disconnect was a code violation, and can cause problems. Same for connection to a j-box in the crawl space.
For best protection, you would like both coaxes to enter the house near the power service, so the ground block ground wire can be short. But that is more important for cable than antennas.
Metal antenna structures must also be connected to the building earthing system.
Excellent information on surge protection is at: http://www.lightningsafety.com/nlsi_lhm/IEEE_Guide.pdf
There are some web sites that have useful information on what is required for antennas.
If you have (had?) a tower that is high enough to be likely to be struck it not only should be connected to ground rods, more protection, like that used by ham radio operators, should be employed. The earthing requirements in the NEC are not intended to protect from direct lightning strikes to the antennas or associated structures.
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