coax grounding

I had a dish network sat dish and outside over the air tv antenna mounted t o a tower until a storm blew through recently and blew the tower over. The
person that installed the dish installed a coax grounding block near the po int of entrance of the coax into the house. Both the over the air coax as w ell as the sat coax were connected to this block. A ground wire ran from th is block about 12 inches to a power cut off box for my outside ac condenser . (Is this legal/proper?)
Anyway, I never had any problems out of the system. Years ago I had a groun d rod at the tower and had nothing but problems with lightening strikes. Wh en the person grounded it to the ac unit thus connecting it to house ground , I never had a problem.
The sat was re installed near its original location except to the eave of t he house. I have been thinking of installing my new antenna and rotor on my vinyl chimney. Currently the chimney is not used, I don't even have gas lo gs although some day I might.
I guess my question is, can I install this set up on my chimney, running my new coax down the side of the house to a new grounding coax block, then ru nning a ground wire from the coax block into the crawlspace to a junction b ox that is already in the crawlspace? (Thus grounding the coax to the house ground).
Also, I noticed that even before, the installer grounded my coax for both t he tv antenna and the sat dish but the masts for each were not connected to any ground. Should they be?
I appreciate any advice.
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I had a dish network sat dish and outside over the air tv antenna mounted to a tower until a storm blew through recently and blew the tower over. The person that installed the dish installed a coax grounding block near the point of entrance of the coax into the house. Both the over the air coax as well as the sat coax were connected to this block. A ground wire ran from this block about 12 inches to a power cut off box for my outside ac condenser. (Is this legal/proper?)
Anyway, I never had any problems out of the system. Years ago I had a ground rod at the tower and had nothing but problems with lightening strikes. When the person grounded it to the ac unit thus connecting it to house ground, I never had a problem.
The sat was re installed near its original location except to the eave of the house. I have been thinking of installing my new antenna and rotor on my vinyl chimney. Currently the chimney is not used, I don't even have gas logs although some day I might.
I guess my question is, can I install this set up on my chimney, running my new coax down the side of the house to a new grounding coax block, then running a ground wire from the coax block into the crawlspace to a junction box that is already in the crawlspace? (Thus grounding the coax to the house ground).
Also, I noticed that even before, the installer grounded my coax for both the tv antenna and the sat dish but the masts for each were not connected to any ground. Should they be?
I appreciate any advice.
==============http://www.solacity.com/grounding.htm
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On 7/10/2014 9:14 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

The reason you had trouble with the tower-only ground is you created a nice current loop between that ground rod and the house electrical ground. The coax and equipment connected to it completed the loop.
The web site is very interesting, but needs a little editing. I got as far as the thin copper strap being 2.5 inches in diameter and decided the BS must be leaking through!
All ground rods need to be connected together and to the house ground at the electrical power entry.
Paul
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On Thu, 10 Jul 2014 10:46:07 -0700, Paul Drahn

As opposed to a darkening strike? Those are even worse!

If my recollector recollects correctly, according to most people's reading of the NEC, there shall be only one ground for the home, By Crom!
--
Liberalism is a pathology.

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On Thu, 10 Jul 2014 21:48:57 -0700, Larry Jaques

When wiring my shop about 15 years ago two ground rods were required unless a ground conductivity test was done and the conductivity was high enough. Needless to say the test is much more expensive for a one off job than driving another ground rod. The rods are pretty close to each other and tied together at or just below ground level. Then a wire from one goes into the meter box. Eric
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Yes; in fact, it's required by the National Electrical Code.

Why would you not use the same ground you've been using, at the A/C unit?

Yes.
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On 7/10/2014 7:38 AM, stryped wrote:

Mine is to a 4' into the ground metal rod and a stranded green wire to the rod from the shield mounting clamp. Putting the ground to the small box, the high voltage could jump in the box to the power legs and into the house..... Oh not again....
Best into the ground. Copper coated steel rod. Hardware store, electrical supply, Lowes, Home Depot, etc.
Martin
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My antenna, rotator and camera cables come in through conduit to a box I can unplug them from when a storm is due.
-jsw
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Martin Eastburn wrote:

Mine is an 8' copper plated rod driven 7'8" into the <rocky !> ground . It's directly below the new meter base , and all grounds will be thru the rod when construction is finished . Right now , everything -including phone and sat - is grounded at the base of the temp power pole next to the camper .
--
Snag



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