Motor in washer

Anyone know if the motor in a whirlpool washer (LSQ8520JQ1) is electrically reversed to pump out the water?

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p4o2 wrote:

Do you have a schematic? There will be an capacitor in series with the start winding. It will connect thru 2 sets of contacts from the drum switch to the start winding and, usually, neutral. One set for forward (agitate) and the other set for reverse (spin/drain). These contacts reverse the polarity of the start cap wrt the start winding. If this is the case, the answer to your question is yes.
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No Spam wrote:

Thank you for the info. The schematic shows the capacitor. The washer is headed for the junk heap since it will not pump out (however it will spin). I guess the problem is in the controller and given the cost(s) of parts and labor it is just as easy to get a new one.
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p4o2 wrote:

If it will spin, it should drain. I had a Maytag that would not drain one time. A sock had gotten over the tub somehow and plugged the hose going to the pump. Also, the Maytag's pump was run by a belt. Dont know about the Whirlpool. Could be worth a look.
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Years ago dishwashers pumped the water out by reversing the motor. Now, a "waste valve" opens and causes the water to go out.
In clothes washing machines the "standard" now seems to be to have a special transmission that causes aggitation when the motor goes one direction and spin when the motor goes in reverse.
Pumping out the water is usually done by a separate motor today although some models still use a solenoid when causes the pump to be driven by the main belt.
It just doesn't take much power (relative the that needed for spinning or aggitation) to pump the water out. The separate motor defintiely makes the most sense.
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John Gilmer wrote:

No plugs in any line(s) or valves. Pump is direct drive from a shaft on opposite side of motor from transmision. On the spot(s) on the controller where it should pump out (no spin) nothing happens (no motor noise). On the spots where it should spin it spins but no water is pumped out (there is a small amount of water in the washer after most is bailed out).
I have gotten to the point where this is a real puzzle to find the problem. I had an idea that the motor might have a seperate armatute driving the pump but only three are showen low, high and start.
Thanks again for the replies.
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Believe it or not, the first time I opened up a top loading automatic washer was back in 1957/58 when I was about 14 years old.
We rented but my parents bought the whole house of furniture including the washer. It was all "as is."
I fixed a few "little things" that over the next few years. The water pump, I recall had a bearing failure which caused a good sized leak (required replacing the body of the pump). On another occasion, the bond between the impeller and the pump shaft failed. The shaft would turn (when the solenoic engaged it) but inside nothing was happening.
So if your pump ain't pumping you might want to ensure first the the pump is actually turning and then ensure that the impeller is still whole and still part of the pump.
Note that because "stuff" often gets into the washing machine, the impellers are often made of some flexible material and bonding to the shaft might with withstand stress.
OR, you some "stuff" might have destroyed the blades of the impeller.
Basically, you gots to take apart the pump and make sure it hasn't been damaged and that it does turn when the motor turns.

Speaking of "reverse" starting a pump:
Two dish washers ago the machine would start a wash or a rinse segment and the next thing the water was all gone.
Turns out the bearings got loose enough that the machine drains even when the motor was going in the pump direction (this was a machine that reversed to pump out the water.) It wasn't particularly efficient pumping out the water but, hey, it had 5 minutes to do the job! I was amazed that the sears didn't fair or the motor didn't "crash.:
Since there is a lot of other wear and tear on on older dish washer, once I know for sure that it will take some work to fix I just replace with new.

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John Gilmer wrote:

The pump itself is easy to take off and it looks undamaged it is just not turned by the shaft from the motor (which is free and hand turnable).
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Does the machine go into the spin cycle if you switch it to that? We just bought a refurbished washer and when we got it home it would not pump the water out. It would fill up, agetate, then just sit there. Called the place we bought it from and he fixed it in like 5 minutes. It was the connector to the safety switch on the top of the machine. It wasn't plugged in. Just a thought, maybe check the lid safety switch.
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